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Religion and Childhood Death in India

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  • Sonia Bhalotra
  • Christine Valente
  • Arthur van Soest

    ()

Abstract

Muslim children in India face substantially lower mortality risks than Hindu children. This is surprising because one would have expected just the opposite: Muslims have, on average, lower socio-economic status, higher fertility, shorter birth-spacing, and are a minority group in India that may be expected to live in areas that have relatively poor public provision. Although higher fertility amongst Muslims as compared with Hindus has excited considerable political and academic attention in India, higher mortality amongst Hindus has gone largely unnoticed. This paper considers this seeming puzzle in depth.

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File URL: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cmpo/publications/papers/2008/wp185.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series The Centre for Market and Public Organisation with number 08/185.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:08/185

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Keywords: religion; child mortality; Muslim; Hindu; India;

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References

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  1. Rajindar Sachar & Saiyid Hamid & T.K. Oommen & M.A. Basith & Rakesh Basant & Akhtar Majeed & Abusaleh Shariff, 2006. "Social, Economic and Educational Status of the Muslim Community of India," Development Economics Working Papers 22136, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
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Cited by:
  1. Saha, U.R., 2012. "Econometric models of child mortality dynamics in rural Bangladesh," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-5242206, Tilburg University.
  2. Asadullah, Niaz & Kambhampati, Uma & López Bóo, Florencia, 2012. "Social Divisions in School Participation and Attainment in India: 1983-2004," IZA Discussion Papers 6329, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Saha, U.R. & Soest, A.H.O. van, 2009. "Infant Mortality in Rural Bangladesh: State Dependence vs. Unobserved Heterogeneity," Discussion Paper 2009-26, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.

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