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Beer, Wood, and Welfare

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  • Grimm, Michael
  • Peters, Jörg

Abstract

Local beer breweries in Burkina Faso absorb a considerable amount of urban woodfuel demand. We assess the woodfuel savings caused by the adoption of improved brewing stoves by these micro-breweries and estimate the implied welfare effects through the woodfuel market on private households as well as the environmental effect. We find substantial wood savings among the breweries and, subsequently, huge welfare gains for households and reductions in CO2-emissions. Since woodfuel is predominantly used for cooking by the poorer strata, the intervention under study is an example for a green growth intervention with pro-poor welfare gains - something green growth strategies should look for.

Suggested Citation

  • Grimm, Michael & Peters, Jörg, 2015. "Beer, Wood, and Welfare," Ruhr Economic Papers 538, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:538
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Burkina Faso; demand for woodfuel; green growth; impact evaluation; improved stoves; technology adoption;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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