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Disseminating New Farming Practices among Small Scale Farmers: An Experimental Intervention in Uganda

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  • Tomoya Matsumoto

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)

Abstract

We used a randomized control trial to measure how the free distribution of hybrid seeds and chemical fertilizers for maize production affected their adoption by small-scale farmers in the subsequent seasons. Information on their demand for the same inputs was collected through sales meetings which we organized in 2009 and 2011 where the inputs were actually sold. It revealed that the demand for the inputs of the free-input recipients was significantly higher in both 2009 and 2011 than that of non-recipients; that of the neighbors of the recipients fell in-between. The initial treatment assignment has a persistent influence on the farmers' demand over the two years whereas the difference between the free-input recipients and their neighbors has been reduced to some extent. The reduction of their gap in the application level of fertilizers is partly driven by social learning through information networks. However, there was no clear evidence of learning effects from peers on the demand for the hybrid seeds. One possible explanation of these mixed results is due to slow dissemination of the new inputs with low profitability. (JEL O13, O33, O55)

Suggested Citation

  • Tomoya Matsumoto, 2013. "Disseminating New Farming Practices among Small Scale Farmers: An Experimental Intervention in Uganda," GRIPS Discussion Papers 13-18, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:13-18
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Esther Duflo & Michael Kremer & Jonathan Robinson, 2011. "Nudging Farmers to Use Fertilizer: Theory and Experimental Evidence from Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(6), pages 2350-2390, October.
    2. Esther Duflo & Michael Kremer & Jonathan Robinson, 2008. "How High Are Rates of Return to Fertilizer? Evidence from Field Experiments in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 482-488, May.
    3. Lori Beaman & Dean Karlan & Bram Thuysbaert & Christopher Udry, 2013. "Profitability of Fertilizer: Experimental Evidence from Female Rice Farmers in Mali," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 381-386, May.
    4. Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Pender, John & Kaizzi, Crammer & Edward, Kato & Mugarura, Samuel, 2005. "Policy options for increasing crop productivity and reducing soil nutrient depletion and poverty in Uganda:," EPTD discussion papers 134, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2010. "Learning about a New Technology: Pineapple in Ghana," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 35-69, March.
    6. Oriana Bandiera & Imran Rasul, 2006. "Social Networks and Technology Adoption in Northern Mozambique," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(514), pages 869-902, October.
    7. Muto, Megumi & Yamano, Takashi, 2009. "The Impact of Mobile Phone Coverage Expansion on Market Participation: Panel Data Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1887-1896, December.
    8. Beaman, Lori & Karlan, Dean & Thuysbaert, Bram & Udry, Christopher, 2013. "Probability of Fertilizer: Experimental Evidence from Female Rice Farmers in Mali," Working Papers 111, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    9. Andrew Zeitlin & Stefano Caria & Richman Dzene & Petr Jansk√Ĺ & Emmanuel Opoku & Francis Teal, 2010. "Heterogeneous returns and the persistence of agricultural technology adoption," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-37, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    10. Omamo, Steven Were, 2003. "Fertilizer trade and pricing in Uganda," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 42(4), pages 1-15, December.
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    13. Tomoya Matsumoto & Takashi Yamano & Dick Sserunkuuma, 2013. "Technology Adoption and Dissemination in Agriculture: Evidence from Sequential Intervention in Maize Production in Uganda," GRIPS Discussion Papers 13-14, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    14. Matsumoto, Tomoya & Yamano, Takashi, 2009. "Soil fertility, fertilizer, and the maize green revolution in East Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5158, The World Bank.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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