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Zinstransmission in der Niedrigzinsphase: Eine empirische Untersuchung des Zinskanals in Deutschland

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  • Hennecke, Peter

Abstract

Diese Untersuchung zeigt, dass die Notenbankzinsen, gemessen an verschiedenen Taylorregeln, für Deutschland bereits seit Langem zu niedrig sind. Dies ist ein Risiko für die Finanzsystemstabilität. Wie stark sich dieses in Deutschlands bankbasiertem Finanzsystem materialisiert, hängt auch davon ab, inwieweit die Niedrigzinsen an Bankkunden durchgereicht wurden. Dies wird mithilfe von Fehlerkorrekturmodellen für verschiedene Zinsarten untersucht. Die Ergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass die gesunkenen Leitzinsen in der Niedrigzinsphase stärker an Bankkunden weitergegeben wurden. Zudem zeigt sich, dass die Aufschläge der Banken auf den Leitzins in der Niedrigzinsphase signifikant zurückgegangen sind; mit negativen Folgen für die Profitabilität deutscher Banken. Für eine strukturelle Veränderung der langfristigen Transmissionsbeziehung gibt es hingegen keine Evidenz. Dies dürfte aus Sicht der Geldpolitik zwar erfreulich sein, die verstärkte kurzfristige Durchleitung der Niedrigzinsen sowie die gesunkenen Zinsmargen geben jedoch Anlass zur Sorge.

Suggested Citation

  • Hennecke, Peter, 2017. "Zinstransmission in der Niedrigzinsphase: Eine empirische Untersuchung des Zinskanals in Deutschland," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 150, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:roswps:150
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    Keywords

    Niedrigzinsen; Transmission; Zinskanal;

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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