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Optimal revelation of life-changing information

Author

Listed:
  • Schweizer, Nikolaus
  • Szech, Nora

Abstract

Information about the future may be instrumentally useful, yet scary. For example, many patients shy away from precise genetic tests about their dispositions for severe diseases. They are afraid that a bad test result could render them desperate due to anticipatory feelings. We show that partially revealing tests are typically optimal when anticipatory utility interacts with an instrumental need for information. The same result emerges when patients rely on probability weighting. Optimal tests provide only two signals, which renders them easily implementable. While the good signal is typically precise, the bad one remains coarse. This way, patients have a substantial chance to learn that they are free of the genetic risk in question. Yet even if the test outcome is bad, they do not end in a situation of no hope.

Suggested Citation

  • Schweizer, Nikolaus & Szech, Nora, 2016. "Optimal revelation of life-changing information," Working Paper Series in Economics 90, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:kitwps:90
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/142153/1/861076648.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hedlund, Jonas, 2017. "Bayesian persuasion by a privately informed sender," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 229-268.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Test Design; Revelation of Information; Design of Beliefs; Medical Tests; Anticipatory Utility; Huntington's Disease;

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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