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Can anticipatory feelings explain anomalous choices of information sources?

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  • Eliaz, Kfir
  • Spiegler, Ran

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  • Eliaz, Kfir & Spiegler, Ran, 2006. "Can anticipatory feelings explain anomalous choices of information sources?," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 87-104, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:56:y:2006:i:1:p:87-104
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Juan D. Carrillo & Thomas Mariotti, 2000. "Strategic Ignorance as a Self-Disciplining Device," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 529-544.
    2. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Jonathan A. Parker, 2005. "Optimal Expectations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1092-1118, September.
    3. Akerlof, George A & Dickens, William T, 1982. "The Economic Consequences of Cognitive Dissonance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 307-319, June.
    4. Caplin, Andrew & Eliaz, Kfir, 2003. " AIDS Policy and Psychology: A Mechanism-Design Approach," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 34(4), pages 631-646, Winter.
    5. Koszegi, Botond, 2003. "Health anxiety and patient behavior," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 1073-1084, November.
    6. Geanakoplos, John & Pearce, David & Stacchetti, Ennio, 1989. "Psychological games and sequential rationality," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 60-79, March.
    7. Safra, Zvi & Sulganik, Eyal, 1995. "On the Nonexistence of Blackwell's Theorem-Type Results with General Preference Relations," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 187-201, May.
    8. Andrew Caplin & John Leahy, 2004. "The supply of information by a concerned expert," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(497), pages 487-505, July.
    9. Kreps, David M & Porteus, Evan L, 1978. "Temporal Resolution of Uncertainty and Dynamic Choice Theory," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 185-200, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Roland Bénabou, 2013. "Groupthink: Collective Delusions in Organizations and Markets," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(2), pages 429-462.
    2. Azrieli, Yaron & Lehrer, Ehud, 2008. "The value of a stochastic information structure," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 679-693, July.
    3. Botond Kőszegi, 2010. "Utility from anticipation and personal equilibrium," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 44(3), pages 415-444, September.
    4. Easaw, Joshy & Ghoshray, Atanu, 2010. "News and households' subjective macroeconomic expectations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 469-475, March.
    5. Chen, Si, 2012. "Optimistic versus Pessimistic--Optimal Judgemental Bias with Reference Point," MPRA Paper 50693, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Elena Argentesi & Helmut Lütkepohl & Massimo Motta, 2010. "Acquisition of Information and Share Prices: An Empirical Investigation of Cognitive Dissonance," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 11, pages 381-396, August.
    7. Eliaz, Kfir & Schotter, Andrew, 2010. "Paying for confidence: An experimental study of the demand for non-instrumental information," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 304-324, November.
    8. Fels, Markus, 2015. "On the value of information: Why people reject medical tests," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-12.
    9. Larry G. Epstein, 2008. "Living with Risk," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1121-1141.
    10. Joshy Easaw & Atanu Ghoshray & Saeed Heravi, 2014. "Households' Forming Subjective Expectations Using Perceived News: Do Shocks to ‘Good’ News Matter More Than ‘Bad’ News?," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82(1), pages 1-16, January.
    11. Francesca Barigozzi & Rosella Levaggi, 2010. "Emotional decision-makers and anomalous attitudes towards information," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 255-280, June.
    12. F. Barigozzi & R. Levaggi, 2006. "A Rationale for Searching (Imprecise) Health Information," Working Papers 559, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    13. Gottlieb, Daniel, 2014. "Imperfect memory and choice under risk," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 127-158.
    14. Schweizer, Nikolaus & Szech, Nora, 2016. "Optimal revelation of life-changing information," Working Paper Series in Economics 90, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering.
    15. Joshy Easaw, 2010. "It’s all ‘bad’ news! Voters’ perception of macroeconomic policy competence," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 145(1), pages 253-264, October.
    16. Nikolaus Schweizer & Nora Szech, 2016. "Optimal Revelation of Life-Changing Information," CESifo Working Paper Series 5941, CESifo Group Munich.

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