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Soziale Ertragsraten und Verteilungseffekte des Humankapitals: internationale Evidenz

  • Gundlach, Erich
  • Hemmer, Hans-Rimbert

Humankapital gilt gemeinhin als eine wesentliche Determinante von Wachstum und Entwicklung. Der empirischen Forschung fällt es derzeit allerdings nicht leicht, die quantitative Relevanz des Humankapitals für den gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklungsprozess zu bestimmen. Neuere Studien bieten ein weites Spektrum von empirischen Ergebnissen. Bils und Klenow (2000) deuten ihre Befunde als Beleg für eine fehlende Kausalitätsbeziehung zwischen schulischer Ausbildung und Wirtschaftswachstum. Klenow und Rodriguez-Clare (1997) sowie Hall und Jones (1999) weisen dem Produktionsfaktor Humankapital für die Erklärung internationaler Produktivitätsunterschiede eine allenfalls marginale direkte Rolle zu, was von Gundlach et al. (in Vorbereitung) auf Basis verbesserter Humankapital-Daten bestritten wird. Weitgehend unbeachtet geblieben ist in der aktuellen empirischen Forschung die Frage, welche zusätzlichen indirekten Produktivitätseffekte von einem höheren Humankapitalbestand ausgelöst werden könnten.

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Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW) in its series Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy with number 3223.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkie:3223
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