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Occupational licensing and the gender wage gap

Author

Listed:
  • Koumenta, Maria
  • Pagliero, Mario
  • Rostam-Afschar, Davud

Abstract

We use a unique survey of the EU labor force to investigate the relationship between occupational licensing and the gender wage gap. We find that the gender wage gap is canceled for licensed self-employed workers. However, this closure of the gender wage gap is not mirrored by significant changes in the gender gap inhours worked. Our results are robust using decomposition methods, quantile regressions, different datasets, and selection correction.

Suggested Citation

  • Koumenta, Maria & Pagliero, Mario & Rostam-Afschar, Davud, 2020. "Occupational licensing and the gender wage gap," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 13-2020, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hohdps:132020
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peter Blair & Bobby Chung, 2017. "Job Market Signaling through Occupational Licensing," Working Papers 2017-50, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Davud Rostam-Afschar, 2014. "Entry regulation and entrepreneurship: a natural experiment in German craftsmanship," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 1067-1101, November.
    3. Robin Jessen & Davud Rostam-Afschar & Sebastian Schmitz, 2018. "How important is precautionary labour supply?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(3), pages 868-891.
    4. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
    5. Moshe Buchinsky, 1998. "The dynamics of changes in the female wage distribution in the USA: a quantile regression approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(1), pages 1-30.
    6. Davud Rostam‐Afschar & Kristina Strohmaier, 2019. "Does Regulation Trade Off Quality against Inequality? The Case of German Architects and Construction Engineers," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 57(4), pages 870-893, December.
    7. Martin Huber & Blaise Melly, 2015. "A Test of the Conditional Independence Assumption in Sample Selection Models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(7), pages 1144-1168, November.
    8. Maury Gittleman & Mark A. Klee & Morris M. Kleiner, 2018. "Analyzing the Labor Market Outcomes of Occupational Licensing," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 57-100, January.
    9. Maria Koumenta & Mario Pagliero, 2019. "Occupational Regulation in the European Union: Coverage and Wage Effects," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 57(4), pages 818-849, December.
    10. Morris M. Kleiner & Evgeny Vorotnikov, 2017. "Analyzing occupational licensing among the states," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 132-158, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Licensing; Gender gap; Wages; Female Labour Supply; Quantile regression; Selection;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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