IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/brjirl/v57y2019i4p870-893.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Does Regulation Trade Off Quality against Inequality? The Case of German Architects and Construction Engineers

Author

Listed:
  • Davud Rostam‐Afschar
  • Kristina Strohmaier

Abstract

We exploit an exogenous price increase of 10 per cent for architectural services to answer the question how price regulation affects income inequality and service quality. Using individual‐level data from the German microcensus for the years 2006–2012, we find a significant reform effect of 8 per cent on personal net income for self‐employed architects and construction engineers. This group moved from the second lowest to the highest quintile of the net income distribution. This increase in inequality is associated with a deterioration of service quality. The reform reduced average scores of a peer ranking for architects by 18 per cent.

Suggested Citation

  • Davud Rostam‐Afschar & Kristina Strohmaier, 2019. "Does Regulation Trade Off Quality against Inequality? The Case of German Architects and Construction Engineers," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 57(4), pages 870-893, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:57:y:2019:i:4:p:870-893
    DOI: 10.1111/bjir.12445
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjir.12445
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1111/bjir.12445?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Davud Rostam-Afschar, 2014. "Entry regulation and entrepreneurship: a natural experiment in German craftsmanship," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 1067-1101, November.
    2. Alberto Abadie & Javier Gardeazabal, 2003. "The Economic Costs of Conflict: A Case Study of the Basque Country," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 113-132, March.
    3. Maria Koumenta & Mario Pagliero, 2017. "Occupational Licensing in the European Union: Coverage and Wage Effects," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 525, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    4. Steiner, Viktor & Fossen, Frank & Rees, Ray & Rostam-Afschar, Davud, 2017. "How Do Entrepreneurial Portfolios Respond to Income Taxation?," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168302, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Robin Jessen & Davud Rostam-Afschar & Sebastian Schmitz, 2018. "How important is precautionary labour supply?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(3), pages 868-891.
    6. Pagliero, Mario, 2011. "What is the objective of professional licensing? Evidence from the US market for lawyers," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 473-483, July.
    7. Matthew Smith & Danny Yagan & Owen Zidar & Eric Zwick, 2019. "Capitalists in the Twenty-First Century," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 134(4), pages 1675-1745.
    8. Milton Friedman & Simon Kuznets, 1945. "Income from Independent Professional Practice," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie54-1, June.
    9. Milton Friedman & Simon Kuznets, 1954. "The Data on Income from Independent Professional Practice," NBER Chapters, in: Income from Independent Professional Practice, pages 46-62, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Koumenta, Maria & Pagliero, Mario & Rostam-Afschar, Davud, 2020. "Occupational licensing and the gender wage gap," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 13-2020, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    2. Giesecke, Johannes & Groß, Martin & Stuth, Stefan, 2020. "Occupational Closure and Wage Inequality: How Occupational Closure Effects Vary Between Workers [Wie berufliche Schließungseffekte zwischen Arbeitnehmergruppen variieren]," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 157-195.
    3. Rostam-Afschar Davud, 2020. "Inklusive Beschäftigungspolitik: Fakten, Herausforderungen und neue Ideen zur Regulierung von Berufen," Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftspolitik, De Gruyter, vol. 69(2), pages 129-139, August.
    4. Mario Pagliero, 2019. "Occupational Licensing in the EU: Protecting Consumers or Limiting Competition?," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 55(1), pages 137-153, August.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Fredriksen, Kaja, 2018. "Does occupational licensing impact incomes? - The German crafts case," ifh Working Papers 11 (2018), Volkswirtschaftliches Institut für Mittelstand und Handwerk an der Universität Göttingen (ifh).
    2. Pagliero, Mario, 2018. "Occupational Licensing, Labor Mobility, and the Unfairness of Entry Standards," CEPR Discussion Papers 13076, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Koumenta, Maria & Pagliero, Mario & Rostam-Afschar, Davud, 2020. "Occupational licensing and the gender wage gap," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 13-2020, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    4. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pb:p:2373-2437 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Steven G. Medema, 2013. "On Why There Is No Milton Friedman Today: Sui Generis, Sui Temporis," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 10(2), pages 197-204, May.
    6. Mario Pagliero & Edward Timmons, 2012. "Occupational Regulation in the European Legal Market," Working papers 27, Former Department of Economics and Public Finance "G. Prato", University of Torino.
    7. Denisa Maria Sologon & Cathal O'Donoghue, 2009. "Equalizing or Disequalizing Lifetime Earnings Differentials?: Earnings Mobility in the EU: 1994-2001," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 251, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    8. Carl Sanders & Christopher Taber, 2012. "Life-Cycle Wage Growth and Heterogeneous Human Capital," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 399-425, July.
    9. Lundborg, Per, 1995. "Job amenity and the incidence of double work," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 273-287, March.
    10. Michele Pellizzari & Giovanni Pica, 2010. "Liberalizing Professional Services: Evidence from Italian Lawyers," Working Papers 372, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    11. Samuel Freije & Andre Potela Souza, 2002. "Earnings Dynamics and Inequality in Venezuela: 1995-1997," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0211, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    12. Rostam-Afschar, Davud & Unsorg, Maximiliane, 2021. "Entry Regulation and Competition: Evidence from Retail and Labor Markets of Pharmacists," GLO Discussion Paper Series 836, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    13. Matz Dahlberg & Magnus Gustavsson, 2008. "Inequality and Crime: Separating the Effects of Permanent and Transitory Income," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 70(2), pages 129-153, April.
    14. Fatih Guvenen & Greg Kaplan & Jae Song & Justin Weidner, 2017. "Lifetime Incomes in the United States over Six Decades," NBER Working Papers 23371, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Denisa Maria Sologon & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2011. "Shaping earnings instability: labour market policy and institutional factors," MERIT Working Papers 2011-077, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    16. SOLOGON Denisa & VAN KERM Philippe, 2014. "Earnings dynamics, foreign workers and the stability of inequality trends in Luxembourg 1988-2009," LISER Working Paper Series 2014-03, LISER.
    17. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:641-692 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Lee A. Lillard, 1977. "Estimation of Permanent and Transitory Response Functions in Panels Data: A Dynamic Labor Supply Model," NBER Working Papers 0185, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Mark Latham, 2017. "‘A fraud, a drunkard, and a worthless scamp’: estate agents, regulation, and Realtors in the interwar period," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 59(5), pages 690-709, July.
    20. Pagliero, Mario, 2013. "The impact of potential labor supply on licensing exam difficulty," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 141-152.
    21. Sam Peltzman, 1981. "Current Developments in the Economics of Regulation," NBER Chapters, in: Studies in Public Regulation, pages 371-384, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Denisa Maria Sologon & Cathal O'Donoghue, 2014. "Shaping Earnings Insecurity: Labor Market Policy and Institutional Factors," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(S1), pages 205-232, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L5 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L74 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Primary Products and Construction - - - Construction
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:57:y:2019:i:4:p:870-893. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/lsepsuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Wiley Content Delivery (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/lsepsuk.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.