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Does the Rise of Robotic Technology Make People Healthier?

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  • Gunadi, Christian
  • Ryu, Hanbyul

Abstract

Technological advancements bring changes to our life, altering our behaviors as well as our role in the economy. In this paper, we examine the potential effect of the rise of robotic technology on health. The results of the analysis suggest that higher penetration of industrial robots in the local labor market is positively related to the health of the low-skilled population. A ten percent increase in robots per 1,000 workers is associated with an approximately 10% reduction in the fraction of low-skilled individuals reporting poor health. Further analysis suggests that reallocation of tasks and reduction in unhealthy behavior partly explain this finding.

Suggested Citation

  • Gunadi, Christian & Ryu, Hanbyul, 2020. "Does the Rise of Robotic Technology Make People Healthier?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 600, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:600
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gihleb, Rania & Giuntella, Osea & Stella, Luca & Wang, Tianyi, 2020. "Industrial Robots, Workers' Safety, and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 13672, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Automation; Robots; Health;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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