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Causes and Consequences of the Protestant Reformation

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  • Becker, Sascha O

    (Department of Economics, University of Warwick)

  • Pfaff, Steven

    (University of Washington)

  • Rubin, Jared

    (Chapman University)

Abstract

The Protestant Reformation is one of the defining events of the last millennium. Nearly 500 years after the Reformation, its causes and consequences have seen a renewed interest in the social sciences. Research in economics, sociology, and political science increasingly uses detailed individual-level, city-level, and regional-level data to identify drivers of the adoption of the Reformation, its diffusion pattern, and its socioeconomic consequences. This survey takes stock of the research so far, tries to point out what we know and what we do not know, and which are the most promising areas for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Becker, Sascha O & Pfaff, Steven & Rubin, Jared, 2016. "Causes and Consequences of the Protestant Reformation," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1105, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:1105
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    Keywords

    Protestant Reformation;

    JEL classification:

    • N33 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion
    • R38 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Government Policy
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation

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