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Carbon Revenue: Recycling versus Technological Incentives

This paper addresses a number of issues about the disposition of the funds generated by the Alberta Specified Gas Emitters Regulation (SGER), focusing on the allocation of funds among three competing broad categories of expenditures: 1. revenue recycling via tax reductions, 2. support for developing new technologies, and 3. support for adoption of existing technologies.

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File URL: http://www.lcerpa.org/public/papers/LCERPA_2014_14.pdf
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Paper provided by Laurier Centre for Economic Research and Policy Analysis in its series LCERPA Working Papers with number 0079.

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Length: 23
Date of creation: 13 Jan 2014
Date of revision: 13 Jan 2014
Handle: RePEc:wlu:lcerpa:0079
Note: LCERPA Working Paper No. 2014-14
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  15. Nemet, Gregory F., 2009. "Demand-pull, technology-push, and government-led incentives for non-incremental technical change," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 700-709, June.
  16. Mowery, David C. & Nelson, Richard R. & Martin, Ben R., 2010. "Technology policy and global warming: Why new policy models are needed (or why putting new wine in old bottles won't work)," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1011-1023, October.
  17. Kverndokk, Snorre & Rosendahl, Knut Einar & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2004. "Climate policies and induced technological change: Impacts and timing of technology subsidies," Memorandum 05/2004, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  18. Paul M. Romer, 2001. "Should the Government Subsidize Supply or Demand in the Market for Scientists and Engineers?," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 1, pages 221-252 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  20. Li, Sheng & Zhang, Xiaosong & Gao, Lin & Jin, Hongguang, 2012. "Learning rates and future cost curves for fossil fuel energy systems with CO2 capture: Methodology and case studies," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 348-356.
  21. Nic Rivers & Mark Jaccard, 2011. "Electric Utility Demand Side Management in Canada," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 93-116.
  22. van der Zwaan, Bob & Rivera-Tinoco, Rodrigo & Lensink, Sander & van den Oosterkamp, Paul, 2012. "Cost reductions for offshore wind power: Exploring the balance between scaling, learning and R&D," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 389-393.
  23. Scott J. Wallsten, 2000. "The Effects of Government-Industry R&D Programs on Private R&D: The Case of the Small Business Innovation Research Program," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 31(1), pages 82-100, Spring.
  24. Nick Johnstone & Ivan Haščič & Margarita Kalamova, 2010. "Environmental Policy Design Characteristics and Technological Innovation: Evidence from Patent Data," OECD Environment Working Papers 16, OECD Publishing.
  25. Morris, Adele C. & Nivola, Pietro S. & Schultze, Charles L., 2012. "Clean energy: Revisiting the challenges of industrial policy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S1), pages 34-42.
  26. Ekins, Paul & Pollitt, Hector & Summerton, Philip & Chewpreecha, Unnada, 2012. "Increasing carbon and material productivity through environmental tax reform," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 365-376.
  27. Sanya Carley, 2012. "Energy demand‐side management: New perspectives for a new era," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(1), pages 6-32, December.
  28. Nakata, Toshihiko & Sato, Takemi & Wang, Hao & Kusunoki, Tomoya & Furubayashi, Takaaki, 2011. "Modeling technological learning and its application for clean coal technologies in Japan," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 330-336, January.
  29. Di Stefano, Giada & Gambardella, Alfonso & Verona, Gianmario, 2012. "Technology push and demand pull perspectives in innovation studies: Current findings and future research directions," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1283-1295.
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