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Increasing carbon and material productivity through environmental tax reform

Author

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  • Ekins, Paul
  • Pollitt, Hector
  • Summerton, Philip
  • Chewpreecha, Unnada

Abstract

Environmental tax reform (ETR), a shift in taxation towards environmental taxes, has been implemented on a small scale in a number of European countries. This paper first gives a short review of the literature about ETR. An Appendix briefly describes the model used for a modelling exercise to explore, through scenarios with low and high international energy prices, the implications of a large-scale ETR in the European Union, sufficient to reach the EU's emission reduction targets for 2020. The paper then reports the results of the exercise. The ETR results in increased carbon and materials, but reduced labour, productivity, with the emission reductions distributed across all sectors as a reduction in the demand for all fossil fuels. There are also small GDP increases for most, but not all, EU countries for all the scenarios, and for the EU as a whole. Both the environmental and macroeconomic outcomes are better with low than with high energy prices, because the former both increases the scale of the ETR required to reach the targets, and reduces the outflow of foreign exchange to pay for energy imports. ETR emerges from the exercise as an attractive and cost-effective policy for environmental improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • Ekins, Paul & Pollitt, Hector & Summerton, Philip & Chewpreecha, Unnada, 2012. "Increasing carbon and material productivity through environmental tax reform," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 365-376.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:42:y:2012:i:c:p:365-376
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2011.11.094
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sam Fankhauser & Frank Jotzo, 2017. "Economic growth and development with low-carbon energy," CCEP Working Papers 1705, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Alberto Gago & Xavier Labandeira & Xiral López Otero, 2014. "A Panorama on Energy Taxes and Green Tax Reforms," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 208(1), pages 145-190, March.
    3. repec:wfo:wstudy:47013 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Miklós Antal & Jeroen C.J.M. van den Bergh, 2014. "Macroeconomics, Financial Crisis and the Environment. Strategies for a Sustainability Transition," WIFO Working Papers 464, WIFO.
    5. Yinger Zheng & Haixia Zheng & Xinyue Ye, 2016. "Using Machine Learning in Environmental Tax Reform Assessment for Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Hubei Province, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-20, November.
    6. Li, Chiao-Ting & Peng, Huei & Sun, Jing, 2013. "Reducing CO2 emissions on the electric grid through a carbon disincentive policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 793-802.
    7. Webster, Allan & Ayatakshi, Sukanya, 2013. "The effect of fossil energy and other environmental taxes on profit incentives for change in an open economy: Evidence from the UK," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1422-1431.
    8. Marisa Beck, Randall Wigle, 2014. "Carbon Revenue: Recycling versus Technological Incentives," LCERPA Working Papers 0079, Laurier Centre for Economic Research and Policy Analysis, revised 13 Jan 2014.
    9. David Oliveira & Isabel Mendes, 2017. "Green Taxation on Competitiveness: The Effect of the ISP Tax on the Portuguese Retail Sector of Road Fuels," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 178-184.
    10. Concetta Castiglione & Davide Infante & Maria Teresa Minervini & Janna Smirnova, 2014. "Environmental taxation in Europe: What does it depend on?," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 1-8, December.

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