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Which policy instruments to induce clean innovating?


  • Veugelers, Reinhilde


In view of the sizeable climate change challenge, we need a clean innovation machine operating at full speed. Beyond the supply of public clean R&D infrastructure and clean public procurement, the development and adoption of new clean technologies by the private sector needs to be assured to reduce Green House Gas (GHG) emissions. The private clean innovation machine, left on its own, is not up to this challenge. It needs government intervention to address the combination of environmental and knowledge externalities and overcome path dependencies. The firm level evidence presented in this contribution on the motives of private sector firms for introducing clean innovations from the latest Flemish CIS eco-innovation survey confirms that firms are responsive to eco-policy demand interventions. At the same time, the high importance of demand pull from customers and voluntary codes of conduct or voluntary sector agreements as drivers for introducing clean innovations, is a reminder of the internal strength of the private innovation machine, which governments need to leverage. Policy interventions are shown to be more powerful to induce the adoption and development of new clean technologies when designed in policy mix and time consistently, affecting future expectations.

Suggested Citation

  • Veugelers, Reinhilde, 2012. "Which policy instruments to induce clean innovating?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(10), pages 1770-1778.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:41:y:2012:i:10:p:1770-1778 DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2012.06.012

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Valentina Bosetti & Carlo Carraro & Romain Duval & Alessandra Sgobbi & Massimo Tavoni, 2009. "The Role of R&D and Technology Diffusion in Climate Change Mitigation: New Perspectives Using the WITCH Model," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 664, OECD Publishing.
    2. Jaffe, Adam B. & Newell, Richard G. & Stavins, Robert N., 2003. "Chapter 11 Technological change and the environment," Handbook of Environmental Economics,in: K. G. Mäler & J. R. Vincent (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 11, pages 461-516 Elsevier.
    3. Nick Johnstone & Ivan Haščič & David Popp, 2010. "Renewable Energy Policies and Technological Innovation: Evidence Based on Patent Counts," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 45(1), pages 133-155, January.
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    5. Popp, David, 2006. "International innovation and diffusion of air pollution control technologies: the effects of NOX and SO2 regulation in the US, Japan, and Germany," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 46-71, January.
    6. David Popp, 2003. "Pollution control innovations and the Clean Air Act of 1990," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 641-660.
    7. Lanjouw, Jean Olson & Mody, Ashoka, 1996. "Innovation and the international diffusion of environmentally responsive technology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 549-571, June.
    8. Arundel, A & Kemp, Rene, 2009. "Measuring eco-innovation," Working Papers 10062, University of Tasmania, Tasmanian School of Business and Economics, revised 30 Aug 2010.
    9. Philippe Aghion & Reinhilde Veugelers & Clément Serre, 2009. "Cold Start for the Green Innovation Machine," Policy Contributions 354, Bruegel.
    10. Philippe Aghion & Reinhilde Veugelers & David Hemous, 2009. "No Green Growth Without Innovation," Policy Briefs 353, Bruegel.
    11. Brunnermeier, Smita B. & Cohen, Mark A., 2003. "Determinants of environmental innovation in US manufacturing industries," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 278-293, March.
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