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The Economic impact of different carbon tax revenue recycling schemes in China: A model-based scenario analysis

Listed author(s):
  • Liu, Yu
  • Lu, Yingying

As an important policy instrument for climate mitigation, the carbon tax policy design and its consequent social-economic impact calls for more research. In this paper, a dynamic Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model – CASIPM-GE model is applied to explore the impact of a carbon tax and different tax revenue recycling schemes on China’s economy. Simulation results show that the carbon tax is effective to reduce carbon emissions with mild impact on China’s macro economy. In particular, a production tax deduction can be used to recycle the carbon tax revenue if the government wants to reduce the cost of a carbon tax; however, a consumption tax deduction may help the economy to restructure and may benefit the long-run emissions reduction. In terms of industrial output, most industries are negatively affected; sectors with large share of exports are subjected to negative shocks if there is consumption tax deduction financed by the carbon tax revenue. The study suggests that carbon revenue recycling scheme is important in designing the carbon tax policy: a well-designed scheme can help reduce the cost of a carbon tax.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Applied Energy.

Volume (Year): 141 (2015)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 96-105

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Handle: RePEc:eee:appene:v:141:y:2015:i:c:p:96-105
DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.12.032
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  1. Marisa Beck, Randall Wigle, 2014. "Carbon Revenue: Recycling versus Technological Incentives," LCERPA Working Papers 0079, Laurier Centre for Economic Research and Policy Analysis, revised 13 Jan 2014.
  2. Wang, Xin & Li, Ji Feng & Zhang, Ya Xiong, 2011. "An analysis on the short-term sectoral competitiveness impact of carbon tax in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4144-4152, July.
  3. Liang, Qiao-Mei & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2012. "Distributional impacts of taxing carbon in China: Results from the CEEPA model," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 545-551.
  4. Timilsina, Govinda R., 2007. "The role of revenue recycling schemes in environmental tax selection : a general equilibrium analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4388, The World Bank.
  5. Jenny Sumner & Lori Bird & Hillary Dobos, 2011. "Carbon taxes: a review of experience and policy design considerations," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 922-943, March.
  6. Newell, Richard G. & Pizer, William A., 2003. "Regulating stock externalities under uncertainty," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2, Supple), pages 416-432, March.
  7. Cameron Hepburn, 2006. "Regulation by Prices, Quantities, or Both: A Review of Instrument Choice," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(2), pages 226-247, Summer.
  8. Callan, Tim & Lyons, Sean & Scott, Susan & Tol, Richard S.J. & Verde, Stefano, 2009. "The distributional implications of a carbon tax in Ireland," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 407-412, February.
  9. Brenner, Mark & Riddle, Matthew & Boyce, James K., 2007. "A Chinese sky trust?: Distributional impacts of carbon charges and revenue recycling in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 1771-1784, March.
  10. Christoph Böhringer & André Müller, 2014. "Environmental Tax Reforms in Switzerland A Computable General Equilibrium Impact Analysis," Working Papers V-361-14, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2014.
  11. Goulder, Lawrence H., 2013. "Climate change policy's interactions with the tax system," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(S1), pages 3-11.
  12. Pezzey, John C.V. & Jotzo, Frank, 2012. "Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 230-236.
  13. Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 2010. "Validating a Detailed, Dynamic CGE Model of the USA," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(s1), pages 22-34, September.
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