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An analysis on the short-term sectoral competitiveness impact of carbon tax in China

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  • Wang, Xin
  • Li, Ji Feng
  • Zhang, Ya Xiong

Abstract

Market-based instruments, particularly carbon tax, have recently drawn the attention of Chinese government by their cost-effective contribution to the achievement of China's climate targets. Most of the recent policy proposals have focused on its long-term impact. However, particularly for policy makers, both long term and short term effects of carbon tax would be necessary when determining tax rates. We provided a detailed analysis of short-term impacts of carbon tax on sectoral competitiveness in this paper. We divided China's economy into 36 sectors, based on its 2007 input-output table, in order to examine the ratio of carbon tax added costs to sector GDP. We were thus able to determine the impact level of a carbon tax on each sector. We then divided the sectoral trade impact into domestic competitiveness with regards to foreign imported products and international competitiveness external to the Chinese domestic market. We found that a high tax level (100 yuan/t CO2) may necessitate compensatory measures to certain highly affected industries, and that a low tax rate (10 yuan/t CO2) would generate few competitiveness problems for all industries and may therefore be considered as an appropriate starting point.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Xin & Li, Ji Feng & Zhang, Ya Xiong, 2011. "An analysis on the short-term sectoral competitiveness impact of carbon tax in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4144-4152, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:7:p:4144-4152
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Li, Nan & Ma, Ding & Chen, Wenying, 2017. "Quantifying the impacts of decarbonisation in China’s cement sector: A perspective from an integrated assessment approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 185(P2), pages 1840-1848.
    2. Fang, Guochang & Tian, Lixin & Fu, Min & Sun, Mei, 2013. "The impacts of carbon tax on energy intensity and economic growth – A dynamic evolution analysis on the case of China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 17-28.
    3. Chiu, Fan-Ping & Kuo, Hsiao-I. & Chen, Chi-Chung & Hsu, Chia-Sheng, 2015. "The energy price equivalence of carbon taxes and emissions trading—Theory and evidence," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 164-171.
    4. repec:kap:jgeosy:v:19:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10109-017-0254-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Farrahi Moghaddam, Reza & Farrahi Moghaddam, Fereydoun & Cheriet, Mohamed, 2013. "A modified GHG intensity indicator: Toward a sustainable global economy based on a carbon border tax and emissions trading," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 363-380.
    6. repec:eee:appene:v:197:y:2017:i:c:p:270-278 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Luo, Xiaohu & Caron, Justin & Karplus, Valerie J. & Zhang, Da & Zhang, Xiliang, 2016. "Interprovincial migration and the stringency of energy policy in China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 164-173.
    8. Li, Ji Feng & Wang, Xin & Zhang, Ya Xiong & Kou, Qin, 2014. "The economic impact of carbon pricing with regulated electricity prices in China—An application of a computable general equilibrium approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 46-56.
    9. Li, Aijun & Lin, Boqiang, 2013. "Comparing climate policies to reduce carbon emissions in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 667-674.
    10. repec:wsi:apjorx:v:34:y:2017:i:01:n:s0217595917400048 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:anture:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:18-30 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Liu, Yu & Lu, Yingying, 2015. "The Economic impact of different carbon tax revenue recycling schemes in China: A model-based scenario analysis," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 96-105.
    13. Menzies, Gordon & Xiao, Sylvia Xiaolin & Dixon, Peter & Peng, Xiujian & Rimmer, Maureen, 2016. "Rural-led exchange rate appreciation in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 15-30.
    14. Webster, Allan & Ayatakshi, Sukanya, 2013. "The effect of fossil energy and other environmental taxes on profit incentives for change in an open economy: Evidence from the UK," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1422-1431.

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