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The US proposed carbon tariffs and China's responses


  • Zhang, ZhongXiang


With current international climate negotiations flawed with a focus on commitments on the two targeted dates of 2020 and 2050, the inclusion of border carbon adjustment measures seems essential to secure passage of any US climate legislation. Against this background, this viewpoint remarks on the needs on the US side to minimize the potential conflicts with WTO provisions in designing its border carbon adjustment measures, and provides suggestions for China how to effectively deal to its advantage while being targeted by such proposed border measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhang, ZhongXiang, 2010. "The US proposed carbon tariffs and China's responses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2168-2170, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:5:p:2168-2170

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Zhang, ZhongXiang, 2009. "Multilateral trade measures in a post-2012 climate change regime? What can be taken from the Montreal Protocol and the WTO?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5105-5112, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ling Tang & Qin Bao & ZhongXiang Zhang & Shouyang Wang, 2015. "Carbon-based border tax adjustments and China’s international trade: analysis based on a dynamic computable general equilibrium model," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(2), pages 329-360, April.
    2. Wang, Xin & Li, Ji Feng & Zhang, Ya Xiong, 2011. "An analysis on the short-term sectoral competitiveness impact of carbon tax in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 4144-4152, July.
    3. Dai, Rui & Zhang, Jianxiong, 2017. "Green process innovation and differentiated pricing strategies with environmental concerns of South-North markets," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 132-150.
    4. Bao, Qin & Tang, Ling & Zhang, ZhongXiang & Wang, Shouyang, 2013. "Impacts of border carbon adjustments on China's sectoral emissions: Simulations with a dynamic computable general equilibrium model," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 77-94.
    5. Grant Ferrier, 2010. "The evolution of the environmental industry in the post-NAFTA era in Mexico," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 147-164, June.
    6. Bao, Qin & Tang, Ling & Zhang, ZhingXiang & Qiao, Han & Wang, Shouyang, 2012. "Impact of Border Carbon Adjustments on China’s Sectoral Emissions: Simulations with a Dynamic Computable General Equilibirum Model," Working Papers 249391, Australian National University, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy.
    7. Liu, Xue & Ma, Shoufeng & Tian, Junfang & Jia, Ning & Li, Geng, 2015. "A system dynamics approach to scenario analysis for urban passenger transport energy consumption and CO2 emissions: A case study of Beijing," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 253-270.

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