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CO2 Embodied in Trade between Poland and Selected Countries


  • Jan T. Mizgajski

    (Department of Market Conditions Research, Faculty of Commodity Science, Poznan University of Economics, Poland)


This study is aimed at analysing the carbon embodied in trade flows between Poland and its major trade partners. Calculations are based on the data from the GTAP database for the year 2004. The study uses an input-output analysis, which allows responsibility to be assigned to individual flows for generating specific amounts of emissions in the economy. It is shown that Polish exports contain significantly more embodied carbon than Polish imports, despite the fact that the value of the imports is higher. Moreover, it is found that among the surveyed countries, only three were net importers of carbon emissions to Poland. Export to Germany is responsible for the most of emissions in Poland. In turn, Poland receives the most emissions from imports from Russia.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan T. Mizgajski, 2013. "CO2 Embodied in Trade between Poland and Selected Countries," Journal of Economic Development, Environment and People, Alliance of Central-Eastern European Universities, vol. 2(4), pages 48-60, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:sph:rjedep:v:2:y:2013:i:4:p:48-60

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yu Hao & Yi-Ming Liu, 2015. "Has the development of FDI and foreign trade contributed to China’s CO 2 emissions? An empirical study with provincial panel data," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 76(2), pages 1079-1091, March.
    2. Yu Hao & Yi-Ming Liu, 2014. "Has the development of FDI and foreign trade contributed to China's CO2 emissions? An empirical study with provincial panel data," CEEP-BIT Working Papers 72, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEP), Beijing Institute of Technology.

    More about this item


    Carbon dioxide; embodied emission; Input–Output analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy


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