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Housing and Social Capital in New Zealand

  • Matthew James Roskruge

    ()

  • Arthur Grimes

    ()

  • Philip McCann
  • Jacques Poot

Does an individual’s housing situation affect community social capital and influence regional development through this channel? A body of literature which followed the seminal work of DiPasquale and Glaeser suggests that homeownership is positively related to social capital formation due to both an increased incentive to engage in the local community and because home ownership creates barriers to mobility. We test the home ownership hypothesis alongside other individual, household and locational determinants of social capital using unique data created by merging the three waves of the New Zealand Quality of Life survey, a local government sponsored survey conducted in 2004, 2006 and 2008. The measures of social capital used in our analysis include trust in others, participation in social networks, attitude towards local governance and sense of community. Because homeownership is not randomly assigned, matching methods are used to control for selection effects.

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File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa10/ERSA2010finalpaper784.pdf
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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa10p784.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa10p784
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  1. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Vincent A. Hildebrand, 2006. "The Wealth And Asset Holdings Of U.S.-Born And Foreign-Born Households: Evidence From Sipp Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 52(1), pages 17-42, 03.
  2. Alex Bryson & Richard Dorsett & Susan Purdon, 2002. "The use of propensity score matching in the evaluation of active labour market policies," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4993, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Huang, Jian & Maassen van den Brink, Henriëtte & Groot, Wim, 2009. "A meta-analysis of the effect of education on social capital," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 454-464, August.
  4. Matthew Roskruge & Arthur Grimes & Philip McCann & Jacques Poot, 2012. "Social Capital and Regional Social Infrastructure Investment," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 35(1), pages 3-25, January.
  5. Mathias Sinning, 2010. "Homeownership and Economic Performance of Immigrants in Germany," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(2), pages 387-409, February.
  6. Michael Greenstone & Ted Gayer, 2007. "Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Approaches to Environmental Economics," Working Papers 0713, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research.
  7. Denise DiPasquale & Edward L. Glaeser, 1998. "Incentives and Social Capital: Are Homeowners Better Citizens?," NBER Working Papers 6363, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2002. "An Economic Approach to Social Capital," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 437-458, November.
  9. Boehm, Thomas P. & Schlottmann, Alan M., 1999. "Does Home Ownership by Parents Have an Economic Impact on Their Children?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 217-232, September.
  10. Donald R. Haurin & Toby L. Parcel & R. Jean Haurin, 2002. "Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 635-666.
  11. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-89, October.
  12. Oswald Andrew J., 1996. "A Conjecture on the Explanation for High Unemployment in the Industrialized Nations : Part I," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 475, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  13. Sascha O. Becker & Andrea Ichino, 2002. "Estimation of average treatment effects based on propensity scores," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(4), pages 358-377, November.
  14. Arthur Grimes & Matthew Roskruge & Philip McCann & Jacques Poot, 2010. "Social capital and regional social infrastructure investment: Evidence from New Zealand," Working Papers 10_03, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
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