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Spatial Effects of Open Borders on the Czech Labour Market

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  • Michael Moritz

    (Institute for Employment Research)

Abstract

Although it was barely analysed in the literature, the fall of the Iron Curtain also had effects on the regional structures of the labour markets in the Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs). Focusing on the Czech Republic I analyse whether, during the undoubtedly increasing integration of markets, the Czech border region close to the Western European high-wage countries benefited from its geographical position. Even without transnational free labour mobility, free trade and outsourcing of production activities can lead to shifts in the labour demand and wage structure with respect to different skill groups. According to the theoretical background these integration effects should be stronger in border regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Moritz, 2009. "Spatial Effects of Open Borders on the Czech Labour Market," WIFO Working Papers 345, WIFO.
  • Handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2009:i:345
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    File URL: https://www.wifo.ac.at/wwa/pubid/37081
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthes, Britta & Burkert, Carola & Biersack, Wolfgang, 2008. "Berufssegmente: Eine empirisch fundierte Neuabgrenzung vergleichbarer beruflicher Einheiten," IAB Discussion Paper 200835, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Hirsch, Boris & Mueller, Steffen, 2010. "Temporary agency work and the user firm's productivity: First evidence from German Panel Data," Discussion Papers 68, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
    3. Kirchner, Stefan & Oppen, Maria & Bellmann, Lutz, 2008. "Zur gesellschaftlichen Einbettung von Organisationswandel : Einführungsdynamik dezentraler Organisationsstrukturen," IAB Discussion Paper 200837, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    4. Bruckmeier, Kerstin & Graf, Tobias & Rudolph, Helmut, 2008. "Working poor: Arm oder bedürftig? : eine Analyse zur Erwerbstätigkeit in der SGB-II-Grundsicherung mit Verwaltungsdaten," IAB Discussion Paper 200834, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

    More about this item

    Keywords

    regional labour markets; border regions; international trade; employment; wage inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions

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