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A simple, analytically solvable, Chamberlinian agglomeration model


  • Pfluger, Michael


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  • Pfluger, Michael, 2004. "A simple, analytically solvable, Chamberlinian agglomeration model," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 565-573, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:34:y:2004:i:5:p:565-573

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fredrik Andersson & Rikard Forslid, 2003. "Tax Competition and Economic Geography," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 5(2), pages 279-303, April.
    2. Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 857-880.
    3. Puga, Diego, 1999. "The rise and fall of regional inequalities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 303-334, February.
    4. Gianmarco Ottaviano & Takatoshi Tabuchi & Jacques-FranÁois Thisse, 2002. "Agglomeration and Trade Revisited," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(2), pages 409-436, May.
    5. Ottaviano, Gianmarco I. P., 2001. "Monopolistic competition, trade, and endogenous spatial fluctuations," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 51-77, February.
    6. J.Peter Neary, 2001. "Of Hype and Hyperbolas: Introducing the New Economic Geography," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 536-561, June.
    7. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    8. Baldwin, Richard E., 1999. "Agglomeration and endogenous capital," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 253-280, February.
    9. Venables, Anthony J, 1996. "Equilibrium Locations of Vertically Linked Industries," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(2), pages 341-359, May.
    10. repec:hhs:iuiwop:430 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Flam, Harry & Helpman, Elhanan, 1987. "Industrial policy under monopolistic competition," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1-2), pages 79-102, February.
    12. Forslid, Rikard, 1999. "Agglomeration with Human and Physical Capital: an Analytically Solvable Case," CEPR Discussion Papers 2102, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Cited by:

    1. Xinyu (Jason) Cao & Marlon G. Boarnet & Xiaoshu Cao & Minoru Osawa & Takashi Akamatsu & Yuki Takayama, 2017. "Harris And Wilson (1978) Model Revisited: The Spatial Period-Doubling Cascade In An Urban Retail Model," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(3), pages 442-466, June.
    2. Michael Moritz, 2011. "Spatial effects of open borders on the Czech labour market," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 19(2), pages 305-331, April.
    3. Marcus Berliant & Tomoya Mori, 2017. "Beyond urban form: How Masahisa Fujita shapes us," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 13(1), pages 5-28, March.
    4. Josep M Vilarrubia & Rubén Segura-Cayuela, 2008. "Uncertainty and entry into export markets," 2008 Meeting Papers 661, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Okubo, Toshihiro, 2009. "Trade liberalisation and agglomeration with firm heterogeneity: Forward and backward linkages," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 530-541, September.
    6. Stephen Sheppard & Dan Zhao, 2016. "Regional Concentration of Industry in China: Decentralised Choices or a Central Plan?," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-17, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    7. Oyama, Daisuke, 2009. "Agglomeration under forward-looking expectations: Potentials and global stability," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 696-713, November.
    8. d'Artis Kancs, 2011. "Labour migration in the enlarged EU: a new economic geography approach," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 171-188.
    9. Marius Brülhart & Matthieu Crozet & Pamina Koenig, 2004. "Enlargement and the EU Periphery: The Impact of Changing Market Potential," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(6), pages 853-875, June.
    10. Akamatsu, Takashi & Mori, Tomoya & Osawa, Minoru & Takayama, Yuki, 2017. "Spatial scale of agglomeration and dispersion: Theoretical foundations and empirical implications," MPRA Paper 80689, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Kurata, Hiroshi & Nomura, Ryoichi & Suga, Nobuhito, 2011. "A Chamberlinian Agglomeration Model with External Economies of Scale," Discussion paper series. A 242, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University.
    12. Dusan Paredes, 2010. "The Role of Regional Price Index in New Economic Geography Models," Documentos de Trabajo en Economia y Ciencia Regional 07, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Chile, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2010.
    13. Marius Brülhart, 2011. "The spatial effects of trade openness: a survey," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 147(1), pages 59-83, April.
    14. Cho, Cheol-Joo, 2017. "The displacement and attraction effects in interurban migration: An application of the input-output scheme to the case of large cities in Korea," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-49, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

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