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Economics of transiting to renewable energy in Morocco : a general equilibrium analysis

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  • Timilsina, Govinda R.
  • Landis, Florian

Abstract

Morocco has set an ambitious target of supplying 42 percent of electricity through renewable sources, 14 percent each through hydro, wind, and solar, by 2020. To analyze the economic and environmental implications of implementing this target, this study uses a dynamic computable general equilibrium model with foresight that includes explicit representation of various electricity generation technologies. Two types of policy instruments, a production subsidy financed through fossil fuel taxation and a renewable energy mandate financed through increased electricity prices, have been considered to attract investment in renewable energy. The study shows that meeting the renewable target would achieve up to 15 percent reduction of national greenhouse gas emissions in 2020 compared with a situation in the absence of the target, or the baseline. However, meeting the target would decrease household consumption of goods and services, thereby worsening household welfare. The study also shows that the renewable production subsidy financed through fossil fuel taxation is superior to the mandate policy to meet the renewable energy target in Morocco, as the former would cause a lower loss in economic welfare and a larger reduction of greenhouse gas emissions than the latter.

Suggested Citation

  • Timilsina, Govinda R. & Landis, Florian, 2014. "Economics of transiting to renewable energy in Morocco : a general equilibrium analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6940, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6940
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Govinda R. Timilsina & John C. Beghin & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe & Simon Mevel, 2012. "The impacts of biofuels targets on land‐use change and food supply: A global CGE assessment," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 315-332, May.
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    3. Thomas W. Hertel & Wallace E. Tyner & Dileep K. Birur, 2010. "The Global Impacts of Biofuel Mandates," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 75-100.
    4. Lipp, Judith, 2007. "Lessons for effective renewable electricity policy from Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5481-5495, November.
    5. Lau, Morten I. & Pahlke, Andreas & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2002. "Approximating infinite-horizon models in a complementarity format: A primer in dynamic general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 577-609, April.
    6. Timilsina, Govinda R. & Csordás, Stefan & Mevel, Simon, 2011. "When does a carbon tax on fossil fuels stimulate biofuels?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2400-2415.
    7. Sorda, Giovanni & Banse, Martin, 2011. "The Response of the German Agricultural Sector to the Envisaged Biofuel Targets in Germany and Abroad: A CGE Simulation," German Journal of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department for Agricultural Economics, vol. 60(04), pages 1-16, November.
    8. Sorda, Giovanni & Banse, Martin, 2011. "The Response of the German Agricultural Sector to the Envisaged Biofuel Targets in Germany and Abroad: A CGE Simulation," Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, Journal of International Agricultural Trade and Development, vol. 60(4).
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    Cited by:

    1. Wu, Jie & Albrecht, Johan & Fan, Ying & Xia, Yan, 2016. "The design of renewable support schemes and CO2 emissions in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 4-11.
    2. Landis,Florian & Timilsina,Govinda R., 2015. "The economics of policy instruments to stimulate wind power in Brazil," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7346, The World Bank.
    3. Timilsina,Govinda R., 2020. "Demystifying the Costs of Electricity Generation Technologies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9303, The World Bank.
    4. Timilsina, Govinda R., 2021. "Are renewable energy technologies cost competitive for electricity generation?," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 658-672.

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    Keywords

    Energy Production and Transportation; Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases; Energy Demand; Environment and Energy Efficiency; Energy and Environment;
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