IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/6497.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Expanding social insurance coverage in urban China

Author

Listed:
  • Giles, John
  • Wang, Dewen
  • Park, Albert

Abstract

This paper first reviews the history of social insurance policy and coverage in urban China, documenting the evolution in the coverage of pensions and medical and unemployment insurance for both local residents and migrants, and highlighting obstacles to expanding coverage. The paper then uses two waves of the China Urban Labor Survey, conducted in 2005 and 2010, to examine the correlates of social insurance participation before and after implementation of the 2008 Labor Contract Law. A higher labor tax wedge is associated with a lower probability that local employed residents participate in social insurance programs, but is not associated with participation of wage-earning migrants, who are more likely to be dissuaded by fragmentation of the social insurance system. The existing gender gap in social insurance coverage is explained by differences in coverage across industrial sectors and firm ownership classes in which men and women work.

Suggested Citation

  • Giles, John & Wang, Dewen & Park, Albert, 2013. "Expanding social insurance coverage in urban China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6497, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6497
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2013/06/24/000158349_20130624115221/Rendered/PDF/WPS6497.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alpaslan Akay & Corrado Giulietti & Juan Robalino & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "Remittances and well-being among rural-to-urban migrants in China," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 517-546, September.
    2. Robert Holzmann & David A. Robalino & Noriyuki Takayama, 2009. "Closing the Coverage Gap : The Role of Social Pensions and Other Retirement Income Transfers," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2651.
    3. Wanchuan Lin & Gordon G. Liu & Gang Chen, 2009. "The Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance: a landmark reform towards universal coverage in China," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(S2), pages 83-96, July.
    4. Liu, Xingzhu & Hsiao, William C. L., 1995. "The cost escalation of social health insurance plans in China: Its implication for public policy," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1095-1101, October.
    5. Haoming Liu, 2011. "Economic Reforms and Gender Inequality in Urban China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(4), pages 839-876.
    6. Holzmann, Robert & Packard, Truman & Cuesta, Jose, 2000. "Extending coverage in multi-pillar pension systems : constraints and hypotheses, preliminary evidence and future research agenda," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 21303, The World Bank.
    7. Giles, John & Park, Albert & Cai, Fang, 2006. "Reemployment of dislocated workers in urban China: The roles of information and incentives," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 582-607, September.
    8. Liu, Yuanli, 2002. "Reforming China's urban health insurance system," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 133-150, May.
    9. Barry Naughton, 2007. "The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262640643, January.
    10. Guillermo E. Perry & William F. Maloney & Omar S. Arias & Pablo Fajnzylber & Andrew D. Mason & Jaime Saavedra-Chanduvi, 2007. "Informality : Exit and Exclusion," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6730.
    11. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo, 2008. "Glass ceiling or sticky floor? Examining the gender earnings differential across the earnings distribution in urban China, 1987-2004," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 243-263, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gallagher, Mary & Giles, John & Park, Albert & Wang, Meiyan, 2013. "China's 2008 labor contract law : implementation and implications for China's workers," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6542, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health Economics&Finance; Insurance&Risk Mitigation; Social Protections&Assistance; Pensions&Retirement Systems; Wages; Compensation&Benefits;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6497. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.