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Performance of skilled migrants in the U.S. : a dynamic approach

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  • Mattoo, Aaditya
  • Neagu, Ileana Cristina
  • Ozden, Caglar

Abstract

The initial occupational placements of male immigrants in the United States labor market vary significantly by country of origin even when education and other individual factors are taken into account. Does the heterogeneity persist over time? Using data from the 1980, 1990, and 2000 Censuses, this paper finds that the performance of migrants from countries with lower initial occupational placement levels improves at a higher rate compared with that of migrants originating from countries with higher initial performance levels. Nevertheless, the magnitude of convergence suggests that full catch-up is unlikely. The impact of country specific attributes on the immigrants'occupational placement occurs mainly through their effect on initial performance and they lose significance when initial occupational levels are controlled for in the estimation.

Suggested Citation

  • Mattoo, Aaditya & Neagu, Ileana Cristina & Ozden, Caglar, 2012. "Performance of skilled migrants in the U.S. : a dynamic approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6140, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6140
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    1. Sergio Lo Iacono & Neli Demireva, 2018. "Returns to Foreign and Host Country Qualifications: Evidence from the US on the Labour Market Placement of Migrants and the Second Generation," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 6(3), pages 142-152.
    2. Ceren Ozgen & Thomas de Graff, 2013. "Sorting out the impact of cultural diversity on innovative firms. An empirical analysis of Dutch micro-data," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2013012, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Population Policies; International Migration; Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement; Human Migrations&Resettlements; Labor Markets;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O24 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Trade Policy; Factor Movement; Foreign Exchange Policy

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