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The impact of EU accession on human capital formation : can migration fuel a brain gain ?

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  • Farchy, Emily

Abstract

Can a brain drain be good for development? Many studies have established the theoretical possibility of such a brain gain. Yet it is only recently that the relaxation of data constraints has allowed for sound empirical assessments. In utilizing the dramatic policy change that accompanied European Union accession as a natural experiment, this paper is able to assuage fears of reverse causality between migration and human capital formation. The results highlight a significant impact of European Union accession on human capital formation indicating that the prospect of migration can indeed fuel skill formation even in the context of middle-income economies. And, if accompanied by policies to promote return migration, as well as a functioning credit market to enable private investment, international labor mobility could represent a powerful tool for growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Farchy, Emily, 2009. "The impact of EU accession on human capital formation : can migration fuel a brain gain ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4845, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4845
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mountford, Andrew, 1997. "Can a brain drain be good for growth in the source economy?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 287-303, August.
    2. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barbara Dietz, 2010. "Migration and Remittances in Macedonia : A Review," Working Papers 281, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    2. Rizwana Siddiqui, 2013. "Impact Evaluation of Remittances for Pakistan: Propensity Score Matching Approach," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 52(1), pages 17-44.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Population Policies; Economic Theory&Research; Labor Policies; Tertiary Education; Access to Finance;

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