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Selective immigration policies, human capital accumulation and migration duration in infinite horizon

  • Magris, Francesco
  • Russo, Giuseppe

An increasing literature fosters selective immigration policies as a tool to increase human capital in both source and destination countries. These policies are supposed to prompt incentives to education, and-if selection is sufficiently severe-to increase the human capital stock in source countries. Nonetheless, when compared to open migration, selective policies make returns to education uncertain, and they may harm incentives to invest in human capital. As a consequence, they may reduce the human capital stock even though selection is "severe". Moreover, when repeated migration is possible, they backfire on migration duration. We obtain our results in an infinite-horizon model that, unlike the current literature, places no restriction on the number of possible migration spells and allows for the possibility of a forced emigration.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research in Economics.

Volume (Year): 63 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 114-126

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Handle: RePEc:eee:reecon:v:63:y:2009:i:2:p:114-126
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622941

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