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Will the Euro trigger more monetary unions in Africa?

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  • Honohan, Patrick
  • Lane, Philip R.

Abstract

The authors analyze the prospects for greater monetary integration in Africa, in the wake of the European Monetary Union. They argue that the structural characteristics of African economies, are quite different from those of European economies, but that much can be gained from monetary cooperation - as an external agency of restraint, and for promoting stability in the financial sector. But one should not expect too much from such arrangements. There is little evidence of contagious attacks on African currencies requiring the coordination of exchange rate policies. And economies of scale in the prudential regulation of financial systems, could be achieved through international cooperation without the need for a common currency. The same is true of enhanced risk-pooling through the financial system. The European Monetary Union has only a marginal impact on the net benefits of monetary cooperation, but the euro would be a natural anchor for any African monetary union - especially if the United Kingdom, and the sterling were to join the European Monetary Union. Indeed, the most likely route to new monetary cooperation in Africa, is through a common peg to the euro.

Suggested Citation

  • Honohan, Patrick & Lane, Philip R., 2000. "Will the Euro trigger more monetary unions in Africa?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2393, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:2393
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lamberte, Mario B. & Milo, Melanie S. & Pontines, Victor, 2001. "NO to ¥E$? Enhancing Economic Integration in East Asia through Closer Monetary Cooperation," Discussion Papers DP 2001-16, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    2. Joao Loureiro & Manuel m.f. Martins & Ana paula Ribeiro, 2010. "Cape Verde: The Case For Euroisation," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(3), pages 248-268, September.
    3. Buigut, Steven & Valev, Neven T., 2009. "Benefits from Mutual Restraint in a Multilateral Monetary Union," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 585-594, March.
    4. Carsten Hefeker, 2010. "Fiscal reform and monetary union in West Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 86-102.
    5. Hefeker, Carsten, 2003. "Fiscal Reform and Monetary Union in West Africa," Discussion Paper Series 26257, Hamburg Institute of International Economics.
    6. Chantal Dupasquier & Patrick N. Osakwe & Shandre M. Thangavelu, 2005. "Choice of Monetary and Exchange Regimes in ECOWAS: An Optimum Currency Area Analysis," SCAPE Policy Research Working Paper Series 0510, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics, SCAPE.
    7. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Lowenberg-DeBoer, James & Arndt, Channing, 2003. "Potential Impacts Of The Proposed West African Monetary Zone On Cowpea Trade In West And Central Africa," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22236, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    8. Léonce Ndikumana, 2003. "Capital Flows, Capital Account Regimes, and Foreign Exchange Rate Regimes in Africa," Working Papers wp55, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    9. Benjamín J Cohen, 2000. "Life at the Top: International Currencies in the 21st Century," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 37(110), pages 9-34.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal&Monetary Policy; Financial Intermediation; Financial Crisis Management&Restructuring; Payment Systems&Infrastructure; Banks&Banking Reform; Fiscal&Monetary Policy; Financial Intermediation; Banks&Banking Reform; Economic Stabilization; Financial Crisis Management&Restructuring;

    JEL classification:

    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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