IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/1596.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Agrarian structure in Poland : the myth of large-farm superiority

Author

Listed:
  • Van Zyl, Johan
  • Miller, Bill R.
  • Parker, Andrew

Abstract

In Poland, present policies are aimed at promoting large, mechanized farms over smaller family farms. These policies are based on the perception that large farms offer real economies of scale. But international evidence indicates that such large, mechanized farms are generally less efficient and use less labor than small family farms. The authors analyzed the relationship between farm size and efficiency in Polish agriculture. They used two different methods to do so. First they determined differences in total factor productivity between small and large farms. They then used Data Envelope Analysis to estimate scale efficiencies. The results show that, for the sample of farms analyzed: 1) large farms are not more efficient than smaller farms; and 2) smaller farms are more labor-intensive than larger farms. These results have important policy implications for farm restructuring in Poland and other transition economies facing similar issues and conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Van Zyl, Johan & Miller, Bill R. & Parker, Andrew, 1996. "Agrarian structure in Poland : the myth of large-farm superiority," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1596, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:1596
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/1996/04/01/000009265_3961214125347/Rendered/PDF/multi_page.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Baumol, William J, 1982. "Contestable Markets: An Uprising in the Theory of Industry Structure," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(1), pages 1-15, March.
    2. Johnson, Nancy L. & Ruttan, Vernon W., 1994. "Why are farms so small?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 691-706, May.
    3. Khusro, A.M., 1964. "Returns to Scale in Indian Agriculture," Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Indian Society of Agricultural Economics, vol. 19(3-4).
    4. Kanel, Don, 1967. "Size of Farm and Economic Development," Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Indian Society of Agricultural Economics, vol. 22(2).
    5. N/A, 1989. "Annual Report," Evaluation Review, , vol. 13(3), pages 320-320, June.
    6. Binswanger, Hans P. & Deininger, Klaus & Feder, Gershon, 1995. "Power, distortions, revolt and reform in agricultural land relations," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 42, pages 2659-2772 Elsevier.
    7. Lipton, Michael, 1993. "Land reform as commenced business: The evidence against stopping," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 641-657, April.
    8. Forsund, Finn R. & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1980. "A survey of frontier production functions and of their relationship to efficiency measurement," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 5-25, May.
    9. Seiford, Lawrence M. & Thrall, Robert M., 1990. "Recent developments in DEA : The mathematical programming approach to frontier analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1-2), pages 7-38.
    10. Michael R. CARTER, 1994. "Sequencing Capital And Land Market Reforms For Broadly Based Growth," Staff Papers 379, University of Wisconsin Madison, AAE.
    11. Carter, Michael R, 1984. "Identification of the Inverse Relationship between Farm Size and Productivity: An Empirical Analysis of Peasant Agricultural Production," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(1), pages 131-145, March.
    12. Feder, Gershon, 1985. "The relation between farm size and farm productivity : The role of family labor, supervision and credit constraints," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2-3), pages 297-313, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gorton, Matthew & Davidova, Sophia, 2004. "Farm productivity and efficiency in the CEE applicant countries: a synthesis of results," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, pages 1-16.
    2. Latruffe, Laure & Balcombe, Kelvin George & Davidova, Sophia & Zawalinska, Katarzyna, 2003. "Technical Efficiency Of Polish Farms: Estimation According To Specialisation And Lessons From Confidence Intervals," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25894, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Zawalinska, Katarzyna, 2005. "Changes in Competitiveness of Farm Sector in Candidate Countries Prior to the EU Accession: The Case of Poland," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24520, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Darla Munroe, 2001. "Economic Efficiency in Polish Peasant Farming: An International Perspective," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 461-471.
    5. Renner, Swetlana, 2014. "Flexibilität in Unternehmen: Eine theoretische und empirische Analyse," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Transition Economies, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), volume 75, number 75, December.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:1596. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.