IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Labour Market Segmentation, Flexibility and Precariousness in the Italian North East


  • Giuseppe Tattara

    () (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Ca� Foscari)

  • Marco Valentini

    (Department of Statistics, University Of Venice Ca� Foscari)


Official Italian statistics undervalue the presence of short-term labour contracts. A more careful account of short term labour contracts more than doubles the official figures ranking Italy among the countries with a large amount of temporary work. Temporary labour contracts represent half of the total yearly labour flows and doubled in recent years in France, Italy and Spain in an attempt to avoid labour market rigidities imposed by the employment national legislations. But temporary contracts have larger potential costs. Very little is known about temporary workers in Italy and it is therefore important to improve our understanding of their career opportunities and to asses the impact of this form labour market flexibility. A succession of temporary jobs can push workers towards more permanent forms of employment, so that worse conditions received during the temporary contract period are compensated for by better conditions in the future. But people working for short spells can be also considered as an extreme case of outsiders, who receive low wages and have worse conditions compared to permanent workers, and this situation may last for their entire working life. In the nineties the divide between movers (non tenure workers) and stayers has increased and a considerable quota of the work force is deemed to never stabilize.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuseppe Tattara & Marco Valentini, 2006. "Labour Market Segmentation, Flexibility and Precariousness in the Italian North East," Working Papers 2006_03_EV, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2006_03_ev

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: First version, 2006
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Canu Rita & Tattara Giuseppe, 2005. "Quando le farfalle mettono le ali. Osservazioni sull'ingresso delle donne nel lavoro dipendente," Economia & lavoro, Carocci editore, issue 2, pages 1-67.
    2. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 189-213, June.
    3. Del Conte Maurizio & Devillanova Carlo & Morelli Silvia, 2004. "L'indice OECD di rigidità nel mercato del lavoro: una nota," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 3, pages 335-356.
    4. Petri Böckerman, 2004. "Perception of Job Instability in Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 67(3), pages 283-314, July.
    5. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
    6. Magnac, T. & Robin, J. -M., 1995. "An econometric analysis of labour market transitions using discrete and tenure data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 106-106, March.
    7. Bruno Contini & Michelangelo Filippi & Claudio Malpede, 2001. "Differenziali retributivi nord-sud: distorsioni attribuibili alla normativa previdenziale," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 13, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    8. Heisz, Andrew, 1996. "Changes in Job Tenure and Job Stability in Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1996095e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    9. Peter AUER & Sandrine CAZES, 2000. "The resilience of the long-term employment relationship: Evidence from the industrialized countries," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 139(4), pages 379-408, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Bosio, Giulio, 2008. "Labour market transition in Italy: an empirical investigation," MPRA Paper 18901, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    Regional Labour Markets; Temporary work; Tenure; Segmentation.;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2006_03_ev. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Geraldine Ludbrook). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.