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Labour Market Segmentation, Flexibility and Precariousness in the Italian North East

In: Non-Standard Employment and Quality of Work. The Case of Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Giuseppe Tattara

    (Università Ca' Foscari di Venezia)

  • Marco Valentini

    (Tolomeo Studi e Ricerche srl, Treviso)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the relation between flexibility and precariousness by using a longitudinal panel constructed from the administrative records of the Italian Social Security System (Inps) and compiled at the Department of Economics, Venice University. The data set concerns the entire population of employees and workers in two provinces, Treviso and Vicenza, of the Italian region of Veneto. Quantitative evidence on the increase in ‘non-standard’ forms of employment during the late 1990s is provided together with some conclusions concerning the downward bias in the measures adopted in official Italian statistics and in international comparisons. The second part of the chapter restricts its analysis to private employees in manufacturing, distinguishing them in ‘movers’ and ‘stayers’. Both categories show signs of instability. The quota of tenured workers over total workers decreases, and movers significantly increase over time. Among these latter are permanent movers, whose fragmented and chaotic work histories are identified and compared with those of workers with more stable careers. The recent spread of new forms of temporary employment among mature workers has exacerbated the recourse to short employment spells and the cost of this new pattern of employment, in terms of both income and human capital loss, is possibly much larger than the benefits that can be expected from greater labour-market flexibility.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuseppe Tattara & Marco Valentini, 2012. "Labour Market Segmentation, Flexibility and Precariousness in the Italian North East," AIEL Series in Labour Economics, in: Tindara Addabbo & Giovanni Solinas (ed.), Non-Standard Employment and Quality of Work. The Case of Italy, edition 1, chapter 8, pages 149-172, AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
  • Handle: RePEc:ail:chapts:06-08
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    File URL: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-7908-2106-2_8
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    Cited by:

    1. Bosio, Giulio, 2008. "Labour market transition in Italy: an empirical investigation," MPRA Paper 18901, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Andrea Ciccarelli & Rinaldo Evangelista & Elena Fabrizi, 2020. "How much (un)stable are new jobs in Italy? an analysis based on the work histories’ data," RIEDS - Rivista Italiana di Economia, Demografia e Statistica - The Italian Journal of Economic, Demographic and Statistical Studies, SIEDS Societa' Italiana di Economia Demografia e Statistica, vol. 74(3-4), pages 51-61, July-Dece.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour market segmentation; flexibility; mobility; precarious jobs.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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