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Africa's lockdown dilemma: High poverty and low trust

Author

Listed:
  • Eva-Maria Egger
  • Sam Jones
  • Patricia Justino
  • Ivan Manhique
  • Ricardo Santos

Abstract

The primary policy response to suppress the spread of COVID-19 in high-income countries has been to lock down large sections of the population. However, there is growing unease that blindly replicating these policies might inflict irreparable damage to poor households and foment social unrest in developing countries. We investigate this concern using Afrobarometer data from 2019 for 30 sub-Saharan African countries. We create a multidimensional index of lockdown readiness based on living conditions and explore its relationship with forms of trust and the potential for social unrest.

Suggested Citation

  • Eva-Maria Egger & Sam Jones & Patricia Justino & Ivan Manhique & Ricardo Santos, 2020. "Africa's lockdown dilemma: High poverty and low trust," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-76, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2020-76
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-1288.
    2. Caitlin S. Brown & Martin Ravallion & Dominique van de Walle, 2020. "Can the World’s Poor Protect Themselves from the New Coronavirus?," NBER Working Papers 27200, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Brodeur, Abel & Grigoryeva, Idaliya & Kattan, Lamis, 2020. "Stay-At-Home Orders, Social Distancing and Trust," IZA Discussion Papers 13234, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Emmanuel Raju & Sonja Ayeb-Karlsson, 2020. "COVID-19: How do you self-isolate in a refugee camp?," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 65(5), pages 515-517, June.
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    RePEc Biblio mentions

    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Developing economies
    2. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Behavioral issues > Trust

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    Cited by:

    1. Rosário Betho & Marcia Chelengo & Sam Jones & Michael Keller & Ibraimo Hassane Mussagy & Dirk van Seventer & Finn Tarp, 2021. "The macroeconomic impact of COVID-19 in Mozambique: A social accounting matrix approach," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2021-93, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Wim Naudé & Ricardo Vinuesa, 2020. "Data, global development, and COVID-19: Lessons and consequences," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-109, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19; lockdown; Poverty; social unrest; Sub-Saharan Africa; Trust;
    All these keywords.

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