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Stay-at-Home Orders, Social Distancing and Trust

Author

Listed:
  • Brodeur, Abel
  • Grigoryeva, Idaliya
  • Kattan, Lamis

Abstract

Better understanding whether and how communities respond to government decisions is crucial for policy makers and health offcials in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we document the socioeconomic determinants of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders' compliance in the U.S. Using cell phone data measuring changes in average distance traveled and non- essential visitation, we find that: stay-at-home orders reduce mobility by about 8{10 percentage points; high-trust counties decrease their mobility significantly more than low-trust counties post-lockdown; and counties with relatively more self-declared democrats decrease significantly more their mobility. We also provide evidence that the estimated effect on compliance post-lockdown is especially large for trust in the press, and relatively smaller for trust in science, medicine or government.

Suggested Citation

  • Brodeur, Abel & Grigoryeva, Idaliya & Kattan, Lamis, 2020. "Stay-at-Home Orders, Social Distancing and Trust," GLO Discussion Paper Series 553, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:553
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19; stay-at-home orders; social distancing; trust;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H12 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Crisis Management
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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