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The Economic Implications of Introducing Carbon Taxes in South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Theresa Alton
  • Channing Arndt
  • Rob Davies
  • Faaiqa Hartley
  • Konstantin Makrelov
  • James Thurlow
  • Dumebi Ubogu

Abstract

South Africa is considering introducing carbon taxes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We evaluate potential impacts using a dynamic economy-wide model linked to an energy sector model. Simulation results indicate that a phased-in carbon tax that reaches US$30 per ton of CO2 by 2022 achieves the ambitious national emissions reductions targets set for 2025. Relative to a baseline with free disposal of CO2, constant world prices and no change in trading partner behaviour, the preferred tax scenario reduces national absorption and employment by 1.2 and 0.6 per cent, respectively, by 2025.

Suggested Citation

  • Theresa Alton & Channing Arndt & Rob Davies & Faaiqa Hartley & Konstantin Makrelov & James Thurlow & Dumebi Ubogu, 2012. "The Economic Implications of Introducing Carbon Taxes in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2012-046, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2012-046
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2012-046.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin L. Weitzman, 2011. "Fat-Tailed Uncertainty in the Economics of Catastrophic Climate Change," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 5(2), pages 275-292, Summer.
    2. repec:hrv:faseco:34728611 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. James Heintz & Dorrit Posel, 2008. "Revisiting Informal Employment And Segmentation In The South African Labour Market," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 76(1), pages 26-44, March.
    4. Devarajan Shantayanan & Go Delfin S & Robinson Sherman & Thierfelder Karen, 2011. "Tax Policy to Reduce Carbon Emissions in a Distorted Economy: Illustrations from a South Africa CGE Model," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-24, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Gago & Xavier Labandeira & Xiral López Otero, 2014. "A Panorama on Energy Taxes and Green Tax Reforms," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 208(1), pages 145-190, March.
    2. Florian Landis and Peter Heindl, 2019. "Renewable Energy Targets in the Context of the EU ETS: Whom do They Benefit Exactly?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 6).
    3. Rulof Petrus Burger & Lodewicus Charl Coetzee & Carl Friedrich Kreuser & Neil Andrew Rankin, 2017. "Income and Price Elasticities of Demand in South Africa: An Application of the Linear Expenditure System," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(4), pages 491-514, December.
    4. Qiao-Mei Liang & Qian Wang & Yi-Ming Wei, 2013. "Assessing the Distributional Impacts of Carbon Tax among Households across Different Income Groups: The Case of China," Energy & Environment, , vol. 24(7-8), pages 1323-1346, December.
    5. Bonga-Bonga, Lumengo & Erero, Jean Luc, 2019. "The Impact of the Dividend Tax in South Africa: A Dynamic CGE Model Analysis," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 72(2), pages 185-208.
    6. Lumengo Bonga-Bonga & Jean Luc Erero & Rangan Gupta, 2016. "Impact of Activity Tax in the Property-Owning and Subletting of Fixed Property Sectors on the South African Economy: A CGE Analysis," Working Papers 201611, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    7. Qian Wang & Qiao-Mei Liang, 2015. "Will a carbon tax hinder China’s efforts to improve its primary income distribution status?," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 20(8), pages 1407-1436, December.
    8. Rulof Petrus Burger & Lodewicus Charl Coetzee & Carl Friedrich Kreuser & Neil Andrew Rankin, 2017. "Income and Price Elasticities of Demand in South Africa: An Application of the Linear Expenditure System," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(4), pages 491-514, December.
    9. Fant, Charles & Adam Schlosser, C. & Strzepek, Kenneth, 2016. "The impact of climate change on wind and solar resources in southern Africa," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 556-564.

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    Keywords

    Income distribution; Public welfare; Environmental aspects (Taxation); Unemployment;
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