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Renewable energy targets in the context of the EU ETS: Whom do they benefit exactly?

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  • Landis, Florian
  • Heindl, Peter

Abstract

We study how European climate and energy policy targets affect different member states and households of different income quintiles within the member states. We find that renewable energy targets in power generation, by reducing EU ETS permit prices, may make net permit exporters worse off and net permit importers better off. This effect appears to dominate the effciency cost of increasing the share of energy provided by renewable energy sources in the countries that adopt such targets. While an increase in prices for energy commodities, which is entailed by the policies in question, affects households in low income quintiles the most, recycling revenues from climate policy allows governments to compensate them for the losses. If renewable targets reduce the revenues from ets permit auctions, member states with large allocations of auctionable permits will lose some of the ability to do so.

Suggested Citation

  • Landis, Florian & Heindl, Peter, 2016. "Renewable energy targets in the context of the EU ETS: Whom do they benefit exactly?," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-026, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:16026
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    Cited by:

    1. Landis, Florian & Fredriksson, Gustav & Rausch, Sebastian, 2021. "Between- and within-country distributional impacts from harmonizing carbon prices in the EU," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C).
    2. Yu, Fan & Xiao, De & Chang, Meng-Shiuh, 2021. "The impact of carbon emission trading schemes on urban-rural income inequality in China: A multi-period difference-in-differences method," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 159(C).
    3. Krzysztof Księżopolski & Grzegorz Maśloch, 2021. "Time Delay Approach to Renewable Energy in the Visegrad Group," Energies, MDPI, vol. 14(7), pages 1-18, March.
    4. Linn, Joshua, 2023. "Emissions Standards and Electric Vehicle Targets for Passenger Vehicles," RFF Working Paper Series 23-05, Resources for the Future.
    5. Finn Roar Aune & Rolf Golombek, 2021. "Are Carbon Prices Redundant in the 2030 EU Climate and Energy Policy Package?," The Energy Journal, , vol. 42(3), pages 225-264, May.
    6. Florian Landis, 2019. "Cost distribution and equity of climate policy in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 155(1), pages 1-28, December.
    7. Mathias Kirchner & Mark Sommer & Claudia Kettner-Marx & Daniela Kletzan-Slamanig & Katharina Köberl & Kurt Kratena, 2018. "CO2 Tax Scenarios for Austria. Impacts on Household Income Groups, CO2 Emissions, and the Economy," WIFO Working Papers 558, WIFO.
    8. Kurt Kratena, 2022. "Supply constraints in a heterogenous agents household demand model: a method for assessing the direct impact of the COVID lockdown," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 49(1), pages 71-97, February.
    9. Kirchner, Mathias & Sommer, Mark & Kratena, Kurt & Kletzan-Slamanig, Daniela & Kettner-Marx, Claudia, 2019. "CO2 taxes, equity and the double dividend – Macroeconomic model simulations for Austria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 295-314.
    10. Luan Santos & Karl Steininger & Marcelle Candido Cordeiro & Johanna Vogel, 2022. "Current Status and Future Perspectives of Carbon Pricing Research in Austria," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(15), pages 1-28, August.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    distributional effects; EU climate policy; renewable energy target;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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