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Globalization and Formal Sector Migration in Brazil

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  • Ernesto Aguayo-Tellez
  • Marc-Andreas Muendler
  • Jennifer Pamela Poole

Abstract

We use novel linked employer-employee data to study the relationship between globalization and formal sector interstate migration for Brazil. We estimate the worker's multichoice migration problem and document that previously unobserved employer covariates are significant predictors associated with migration flows. Our results provide support for the idea that globalization acts on internal migration through the growth of employment opportunities at locations with a high concentration of foreign owned establishments and the stability of employment at exporting establishments.

Suggested Citation

  • Ernesto Aguayo-Tellez & Marc-Andreas Muendler & Jennifer Pamela Poole, 2008. "Globalization and Formal Sector Migration in Brazil," WIDER Working Paper Series RP2008-22, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:rp2008-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Naércio Aquino Menezes-Filho & Marc-Andreas Muendler & Garey Ramey, 2008. "The Structure of Worker Compensation in Brazil, with a Comparison to France and the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(2), pages 324-346, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2012. "World Development Report 2013 [Rapport sur le développement dans le monde 2013]," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11843, June.
    2. Naércio Aquino Menezes Filho & Marc-Andreas Muendler, 2007. "Labor Reallocation in Response to Trade Reform," CESifo Working Paper Series 1936, CESifo.
    3. Trevor Tombe & Jennifer Winter, "undated". "Fiscal Integration with Internal Trade: Quantifying the Effects of Equalizing Transfers," Working Papers 2013-28, Department of Economics, University of Calgary, revised 04 Oct 2018.
    4. Xiaodong Zhu & Trevor Tombe, 2015. "Trade, Migration and Regional Income Differences: Evidence from China," 2015 Meeting Papers 1534, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Kwok Tong Soo, 2014. "Zipf, Gibrat and geography: Evidence from China, India and Brazil," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 159-181, March.
    6. Trevor Tombe & Xiaodong Zhu, 2019. "Trade, Migration, and Productivity: A Quantitative Analysis of China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 109(5), pages 1843-1872, May.
    7. Laura Hering & Rodrigo Paillacar, 2016. "Does Access to Foreign Markets Shape Internal Migration? Evidence from Brazil," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(1), pages 78-103.
    8. Eva-Maria Egger, 2019. "Migrants leaving mega-cities: Where they move and why prices matter," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-113, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Almeida, Rita K. & Poole, Jennifer P., 2017. "Trade and labor reallocation with heterogeneous enforcement of labor regulations," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 154-166.
    10. Miguel Flores & Mary Zey & Nazrul Hoque, 2013. "Economic Liberalization and Contemporary Determinants of Mexico's Internal Migration: An Application of Spatial Gravity Models," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 195-214, June.

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    Keywords

    Commercial policy; Globalization; International business enterprises; International trade; Migration; Internal;
    All these keywords.

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