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Lengua y emigración: España y el español en las migraciones internacionales


  • José Antonio Alonso

    () (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales (ICEI))

  • Rodolfo Gutiérrez

    () (Universidad de Oviedo)


El propósito de este trabajo es investigar el papel que la lengua tiene en los procesos de decisión de los emigrantes y en los resultados de su experiencia migratoria, tomando como referencia el caso español. Para ello se recurre a bases de datos y a enfoques muy poco explorados hasta el momento. Los resultados confirman que la comunidad de lengua incide en la selección del mercado de destino del emigrante, incorpora un premio en su retribución laboral y facilita los procesos de integración social en el mercado español.

Suggested Citation

  • José Antonio Alonso & Rodolfo Gutiérrez, 2010. "Lengua y emigración: España y el español en las migraciones internacionales," Documentos de Trabajo del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales 14-10, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucm:dticei:14-10

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    References listed on IDEAS

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