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Job Loss by Wage Level: Lessons from the Great Recession in Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Brian Nolan

    (Institute for New Economic Thinking and Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford)

  • Sarah Voitchovsky

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This paper explores the pattern of job loss in the Great Recession with a particular focus on its incidence by wage level, using data for Ireland. Ireland experienced a particularly pronounced decline in employment with the onset of the recession by international and historical standards, which makes it a valuable case study. Using EU-SILC data, our analysis identifies which employees were most affected. The results show that the probability of staying in employment, from one year to the next, is positively related to monthly wages both during the boom and in the bust. The gradient with wages, however, is much more marked in the bust, and remains significantly so even after controlling for a range of individual characteristics including part-time status, demographics, education, labour market history, industries or occupations.

Suggested Citation

  • Brian Nolan & Sarah Voitchovsky, 2015. "Job Loss by Wage Level: Lessons from the Great Recession in Ireland," Working Papers 201519, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:201519
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    File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/geary/static/publications/workingpapers/gearywp201519.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2015
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Aedín Doris & Donal O’Neill & Olive Sweetman, 2015. "Wage flexibility and the great recession: the response of the Irish labour market," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, December.
    2. Savage, Micheal & Callan, Tim & Nolan, Brian & Colgan, Brian, 2015. "The Great Recession, Austerity and Inequality: Evidence from Ireland," Papers WP499, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Christopher L. Foote & Richard W. Ryan, 2015. "Labor-Market Polarization over the Business Cycle," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 371-413.
    4. Kelly, Elish & McGuinness, Seamus, 2015. "Impact of the Great Recession on unemployed and NEET individuals’ labour market transitions in Ireland," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 59-71.
    5. McGinnity, Fran & Russell, Helen & Watson, Dorothy & Kingston, Gillian & Kelly, Elish, 2014. "Winners and Losers? The Equality Impact of the Great Recession in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT265.
    6. Wilkins, Roger & Wooden, Mark, 2011. "Gender Differences in Rates of Job Dismissal: Why Are Men More Likely to Lose Their Jobs?," IZA Discussion Papers 6225, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Tamás Bartus, 2005. "Estimation of marginal effects using margeff," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 5(3), pages 309-329, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Niamh Holton & Donal O'Neill, 2017. "The Changing Nature of Irish Wage Inequality from Boom to Bust," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 48(1), pages 1-26.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    skills; occupations; wages; Great Recession; Ireland; job loss; EU-SILC;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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