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Environmental Policy Instrument Choice and International Trade

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Abstract

We develop a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model to understand how environmental policy instrument choice affects trade. We extend the existing literature by employing an open economy model to evaluate three environmental policy instruments: cap-and-trade, pollution taxes, and an emissions intensity standard in the face of two types of exogenous shocks. We calibrate the model to Canadian data and simulate productivity and import price shocks. We evaluate the evolution of key macroeconomic variables, including the trade balance in response to the shocks under each policy instrument. Our findings for the evolution of output and emissions under a productivity shock are consistent with previous closed economy models. Our open economy framework allows us to find that a cap-and-trade policy dampens the international trade effects of the business cycle relative to an emissions tax or intensity standard. Under an import shock, pollution taxes and intensity targets are as effective as cap-and-trade policies in reducing variance in consumption and employment. The cap-and-trade policy limits the intensity of the import competition shock suggesting that particular policy instrument might serve as a barrier to trade.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Scott Holladay & Mohammed Mohsin & Shreekar Pradhan, 2019. "Environmental Policy Instrument Choice and International Trade," Working Papers 2019-01, University of Tennessee, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ten:wpaper:2019-01
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Environmental Policy Instrument Choice and International Trade
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2019-03-29 03:24:21

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    Cited by:

    1. Xiao, Bowen & Fan, Ying & Guo, Xiaodan, 2021. "Dynamic interactive effect and co-design of SO2 emission tax and CO2 emission trading scheme," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 152(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental policy; Import competition; Business cycles; Macroeconomic dynamics; Open economy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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