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International Transmissions to Australia: The Roles of the US and Euro Area

This paper examines the influences of the two largest developed economies, namely the US and the Euro area, on Australia as an exemplar of a small open economy. To do so, we specify and estimate a structural VAR with bilateral linkages between the two large economies, and allow shocks originating there to affect the Australian economy. More specifically, we show the role of foreign demand shocks, the differential effects of US or European sourced inflation and interest rate shocks on the Australian economy, and the relative unimportance of these foreign shocks to variations in the value of the Australian currency

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File URL: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/17208/1/2013-10_DunOsbRag.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Tasmania, Tasmanian School of Business and Economics in its series Working Papers with number 17208.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 16 Oct 2013
Date of revision: 16 Oct 2013
Publication status: Published by the University of Tasmania. Discussion paper 2013-10
Handle: RePEc:tas:wpaper:17208
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Web page: http://www.utas.edu.au/business-and-economics

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  1. Pablo Guerron-Quintana, 2012. "Common and idiosyncratic disturbances in developed small open economies," Working Papers 12-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  2. Lance A. Fisher & Hyeon-seung Huh & Adrian R. Pagan, 2013. "Econometric Issues when Modelling with a Mixture of I(1) and I(0) Variables," Working papers 2013rwp-61, Yonsei University, Yonsei Economics Research Institute.
  3. Fabio Milani, 2009. "Global slack and domestic inflation rates: a structural investigation for G-7 countries," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 33, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  4. Jarkko P. Jääskelä & Kristoffer Nimark, 2011. "A Medium‐Scale New Keynesian Open Economy Model of Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(276), pages 11-36, March.
  5. Leu, Shawn Chen-Yu & Sheen, Jeffrey, 2011. "A small New Keynesian state space model of the Australian economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 672-684.
  6. Pau Rabanal & Juan F. Rubio-Ramirez & Vicente Tuesta, 2009. "Cointegrated TFP processes and international business cycles," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2009-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  7. Daniel Buncic & Martin Melecky, 2008. "An Estimated New Keynesian Policy Model for Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(264), pages 1-16, 03.
  8. Leu, Shawn Chen-Yu, 2011. "A New Keynesian SVAR model of the Australian economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 157-168, January.
  9. Anderson, Heather M. & Dungey, Mardi & Osborn, Denise R. & Vahid, Farshid, 2011. "Financial integration and the construction of historical financial data for the Euro Area," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 1498-1509, July.
  10. Lee, Hyun-Hoon & Huh, Hyeon-Seung & Harris, David, 2003. "The relative impact of the US and Japanese business cycles on the Australian economy," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 111-129, January.
  11. Mardi Dungey & Renée Fry-McKibbin & Verity Linehan, 2013. "Chinese Resource Demand and the Natural Resource Supplier," CAMA Working Papers 2013-54, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  12. Kristoffer Nimark, 2009. "A structural model of Australia as a small open economy," Economics Working Papers 1211, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  13. Bernard, Andrew B & Durlauf, Steven N, 1995. "Convergence in International Output," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(2), pages 97-108, April-Jun.
  14. Edda Claus & Mardi Dungey & Renee Fry, 2006. "Monetary Policy In Illiquid Markets: Options For A Small Open Economy," CAMA Working Papers 2006-17, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  15. Brian P. Sack & Volker W. Wieland, 1999. "Interest-rate smoothing and optimal monetary policy: a review of recent empirical evidence," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1999-39, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  16. David O. Cushman & Tao Zha, 1995. "Identifying monetary policy in a small open economy under flexible exchange rates," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 95-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  17. Sean Langcake & Tim Robinson, 2013. "An Empirical BVAR-DSGE Model of the Australian Economy," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2013-07, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  18. Voss, G.M. & Willard, L.B., 2009. "Monetary policy and the exchange rate: Evidence from a two-country model," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 708-720, December.
  19. Michael Plumb & Christopher Kent & James Bishop, 2013. "Implications for the Australian Economy of Strong Growth in Asia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2013-03, Reserve Bank of Australia.
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