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A Tool to Optimize the Initial Distribution of Hydrogen Filling Stations

Author

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  • Malte Schwoon

    () (Statkraft, Duesseldorf)

Abstract

An important barrier towards the introduction of fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) running on hydrogen is the lack of widespread refueling infrastructure. The niche of buses for public transport, taxis and deliverers with a local application area might not be large enough to generate the reductions of FCV costs that are necessary for a general technology switch. Thus, fuel availability at trunk roads probably plays a crucial role in generating demand for FCVs also from private consumers. In this paper we assume that consumers are more likely to consider buying a FCV the more frequently they are exposed to hydrogen refueling opportunities on long distant trips. We introduce a tool to test different small scale initial distributions of hydrogen outlets within the German trunk road system for their potential success to generate a large scale adoption of FCVs. The tool makes use of agent based trip modeling and Geographic Information System (GIS) supported spatial modeling. We demonstrate its potentials by testing a ring shaped distribution of hydrogen outlets at highway filling stations. We find that the structure of an optimized initial distribution of filling stations depends on what drivers consider a sufficiently small distance between refueling opportunities.

Suggested Citation

  • Malte Schwoon, 2006. "A Tool to Optimize the Initial Distribution of Hydrogen Filling Stations," Working Papers FNU-110, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jun 2006.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgc:wpaper:110
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    File URL: http://www.fnu.zmaw.de/fileadmin/fnu-files/publication/working-papers/WP-FNU-112FCV_learning_by_doing.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gary W. Yohe & Richard S.J. Tol, 2007. "Precaution And A Dismal Theorem: Implications For Climate Policy And Climate Research," Working Papers FNU-145, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Aug 2007.
    2. Antje-Mareike Dietrich & Gernot Sieg, 2014. "Welfare Effects of Subsidizing a Dead-End Network of Less Polluting Vehicles," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 335-355, December.
    3. Gnann, Till & Plötz, Patrick, 2015. "A review of combined models for market diffusion of alternative fuel vehicles and their refueling infrastructure," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 783-793.
    4. Martin Zsifkovits & Markus Günther, 2015. "Simulating resistances in innovation diffusion over multiple generations: an agent-based approach for fuel-cell vehicles," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 23(2), pages 501-522, June.
    5. Dritan Osmani, "undated". "A note on optimal transfer schemes, stable coalition for environmental protection and joint maximization assumption," Working Papers FNU-176, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agent based modeling; Alternative fueled vehicles; Hydrogen; Fuel Cells;

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory

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