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Subsidies for renewable energies in the presence of learning effects and market power

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  • Reichenbach, Johanna
  • Requate, Till

Abstract

We study the impact of learning by doing, learning spill-overs, and imperfect competition in a model with two types of electricity producers, an oligopolistic sector of polluting fossil-fuel utilities and a competitive fringe of non-polluting generators of electricity from renewable energy sources (RES-E). Furthermore we consider an upstream industry of RES-E equipment producers engaged in learning by doing. We show that a first-best policy requires two instruments, a tax in the fossil-fuel sector and an output subsidy for RES-E equipment producers. We then study second-best-optimal feed-in tariffs that are paid to the generators of RES-E. By means of simulations we calculate the welfare loss of a second-best-optimal feed-in-tariff policy and analyze how market structure impacts on second-best-optimal feed-in tariffs.

Suggested Citation

  • Reichenbach, Johanna & Requate, Till, 2012. "Subsidies for renewable energies in the presence of learning effects and market power," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 236-254.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:34:y:2012:i:2:p:236-254 DOI: 10.1016/j.reseneeco.2011.11.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Fabio Antoniou & Roland Strausz, 2014. "The Effectiveness of Taxation and Feed-in Tariffs," CESifo Working Paper Series 4788, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2014. "Timing of adoption of clean technologies, transboundary pollution and international trade," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 8, pages 1-31.
    3. Reichenbach, Johanna & Requate, Till, 2012. "Subsidies for renewable energies in the presence of learning effects and market power," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 236-254.
    4. Lin, Boqiang & He, Jiaxin, 2017. "Is biomass power a good choice for governments in China?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 1218-1230.
    5. Bahr, Gunter & Narita, Daiju & Rickels, Wilfried, 2012. "Recent developments in European support systems for renewable power," Kiel Policy Brief 53, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Eichner, Thomas & Pethig, Rüdiger, 2014. "International carbon emissions trading and strategic incentives to subsidize green energy," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 469-486.
    7. Slim Ben Youssef, 2015. "Timing of Adoption of Clean Technologies by Regulated Monopolies," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 62(1), pages 77-92, March.
    8. Till Requate, 2015. "Green tradable certificates versus feed-in tariffs in the promotion of renewable energy shares," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(2), pages 211-239, April.
    9. Nachtigall, Daniel & Rübbelke, Dirk, 2016. "The green paradox and learning-by-doing in the renewable energy sector," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 74-92.
    10. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2015. "Efficient Management of Insecure Fossil Fuel Imports through Taxing Domestic Green Energy?," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(5), pages 724-751, October.
    11. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2015. "Lobbying for and Against Subsidizing Green Energy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(4), pages 925-947, December.
    12. Wei, Wenjie, 2014. "Welfare and Environmental Effects of Subsidies and Tariffs in North-South Trade in Renewable Energy Equipment," 2014 Conference (58th), February 4-7, 2014, Port Maquarie, Australia 165887, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    13. Andor, Mark & Voss, Achim, 2016. "Optimal renewable-energy promotion: Capacity subsidies vs. generation subsidies," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 144-158.
    14. repec:zbw:rwirep:0473 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Zhang, M.M. & Zhou, D.Q. & Zhou, P. & Chen, H.T., 2017. "Optimal design of subsidy to stimulate renewable energy investments: The case of China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 873-883.
    16. Zhang, Huiming & Zheng, Yu & Ozturk, U. Aytun & Li, Shanjun, 2016. "The impact of subsidies on overcapacity: A comparison of wind and solar energy companies in China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 821-827.
    17. Ben-Moshe, Ori & Rubin, Ofir D., 2015. "Does wind energy mitigate market power in deregulated electricity markets?," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 511-521.
    18. repec:kap:enreec:v:67:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10640-016-0012-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:1:p:124-:d:125820 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Feed-in tariffs; Environmental subsidies; Learning by doing; Spill-overs; Market structure;

    JEL classification:

    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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