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The Establishment of the Danish Windmill Industry - Was it Worthwhile?

Author

Listed:
  • Jørgen Drud Hansen

    (The Aarhus School of Business, Denmark)

  • Camilla Jensen

    (The Aarhus School of Business, Denmark)

  • Erik Strøjer Madsen

    (The Aarhus School of Business, Denmark)

Abstract

The European Court of Justice's definition of when a firm has a dominant position has recently come under attack as being meaningless and impossible to measure. We argue that both attacks are wrong, suggest an economic interpretation of domination and propose how it may be measured using modern time series econometrics. We illustrate the approach empirically.

Suggested Citation

  • Jørgen Drud Hansen & Camilla Jensen & Erik Strøjer Madsen, 2002. "The Establishment of the Danish Windmill Industry - Was it Worthwhile?," CIE Discussion Papers 2002-07, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Industrial Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuieci:2002-07
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/cie/dp/dp_2000-2002/2002-07.pdf/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Madsen, Erik Strøjer & Jensen, Camilla & Hansen, Jørgen Drud, 2002. "Scale in Technology and Learning-by-Doing in the Windmill Industry," Working Papers 02-2, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    2. Irwin, Douglas A & Klenow, Peter J, 1994. "Learning-by-Doing Spillovers in the Semiconductor Industry," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1200-1227, December.
    3. Kazuhiro Mishina, 1999. "Learning by New Experiences: Revisiting the Flying Fortress Learning Curve," NBER Chapters,in: Learning by Doing in Markets, Firms, and Countries, pages 145-184 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Krugman, Paul, 1987. "The narrow moving band, the Dutch disease, and the competitive consequences of Mrs. Thatcher : Notes on trade in the presence of dynamic scale economies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1-2), pages 41-55, October.
    5. C. Lanier Benkard, 1999. "Learning and Forgetting: The Dynamics of Aircraft Production," NBER Working Papers 7127, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lehmann, Paul, 2013. "Supplementing an emissions tax by a feed-in tariff for renewable electricity to address learning spillovers," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 635-641.
    2. Malte Schwoon, 2006. "Learning-by-doing, Learning Spillovers and the Diffusion of Fuel Cell Vehicles," Working Papers FNU-112, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jun 2006.
    3. Lehmann, Paul & Gawel, Erik, 2013. "Why should support schemes for renewable electricity complement the EU emissions trading scheme?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 597-607.
    4. Lindman, Åsa & Söderholm, Patrik, 2012. "Wind power learning rates: A conceptual review and meta-analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 754-761.
    5. Iyer, Gokul C. & Clarke, Leon E. & Edmonds, James A. & Hultman, Nathan E., 2016. "Do national-level policies to promote low-carbon technology deployment pay off for the investor countries?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 400-411.
    6. Iyer, Gokul C. & Clarke, Leon E. & Edmonds, James A. & Hultman, Nathan E. & McJeon, Haewon C., 2015. "Long-term payoffs of near-term low-carbon deployment policies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 493-505.
    7. Reichenbach, Johanna & Requate, Till, 2012. "Subsidies for renewable energies in the presence of learning effects and market power," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 236-254.
    8. Zylicz, Tomasz, 2010. "Goals and Principles of Environmental Policy," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 3(4), pages 299-334, May.
    9. Brandt, Urs Steiner & Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard, 2006. "Climate change negotiations and first-mover advantages: the case of the wind turbine industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1175-1184, July.
    10. Bläsi, Albrecht & Requate, Till, 2007. "Subsidies for Wind Power: Surfing down the Learning Curve?," Economics Working Papers 2007-28, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    11. Urs Steiner Brandt & Gert Tinggaard Svendsen, 2004. "Fighting Windmills: The Coalition of Industrialists and Environmentalists in the Climate Change Issue," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 327-337, December.
    12. Lehmann, Paul, 2009. "Climate Policies with Pollution Externalities and Learning Spillovers," MPRA Paper 21353, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Brandt, Urs Steiner & Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard, 2004. "Switch Point and First-Mover Advantage: The Case of the Wind Turbine Industry," Working Papers 04-2, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    14. Söderholm, Patrik, 2008. "The political economy of international green certificate markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 2051-2062, June.
    15. Iyer, Gokul & Hultman, Nathan & Fetter, Steve & Kim, Son H., 2014. "Implications of small modular reactors for climate change mitigation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 144-154.
    16. Harrison, Ann & Rodríguez-Clare, Andrés, 2010. "Trade, Foreign Investment, and Industrial Policy for Developing Countries," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    17. Sijm, Jos & Lehmann, Paul & Chewpreecha, Unnada & Gawel, Erik & Mercure, Jean-Francois & Pollitt, Hector & Strunz, Sebastian, 2014. "EU climate and energy policy beyond 2020: Are additional targets and instruments for renewables economically reasonable?," UFZ Discussion Papers 3/2014, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).
    18. Söderholm, Patrik & Sundqvist, Thomas, 2007. "Empirical challenges in the use of learning curves for assessing the economic prospects of renewable energy technologies," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 32(15), pages 2559-2578.
    19. Urs Steiner Brandt & Gert Tinggaard Svendsen, 2003. "Fighting windmills? EU industrial interests and global climate negotiations," Working Papers 37/03, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Sociology, Environmental and Business Economics.
    20. Malte Schwoon, 2006. "A Tool to Optimize the Initial Distribution of Hydrogen Filling Stations," Working Papers FNU-110, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jun 2006.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    learning-by-doing; infant industry; green subsidies;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • L5 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy
    • L6 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing

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