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Resilience thresholds to temperature shocks in rural Tanzania: a long-run assessment

Author

Listed:
  • Marco d'Errico

    () (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

  • Marco Letta

    () (Department of Economics and Social Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (IT).)

  • Pierluigi Montalbano

    () (Department of Economics and Social Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (IT).)

  • Rebecca Pietrelli

    () (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

Abstract

The study of household resilience is a key issue in development economics. This paper adds to the literature by exploring the role of resilience in mediating the relationship between food consumption growth and temperature shocks. To make up for the lack of long micro panels, we generate a synthetic panel for rural Tanzania covering the time span 2000 – 2013. Our main contribution is the identification of resilience thresholds below which households are unable to absorb the negative effects of temperature shocks. These thresholds have important implications for adaptation to climate change in developing countries and, more generally, significant consequences for policy-makers and intervention design.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco d'Errico & Marco Letta & Pierluigi Montalbano & Rebecca Pietrelli, 2018. "Resilience thresholds to temperature shocks in rural Tanzania: a long-run assessment," Working Papers 2/18, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
  • Handle: RePEc:saq:wpaper:2/18
    as

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    File URL: http://www.diss.uniroma1.it/sites/default/files/allegati/DiSSE_derricoetal_wp2_2018.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Resilience thresholds; Food security; Household growth; Temperature shocks; Climate change.;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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