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Resilience Thresholds to Temperature Anomalies: A Long-run Test for Rural Tanzania

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  • d'Errico, Marco
  • Letta, Marco
  • Montalbano, Pierluigi
  • Pietrelli, Rebecca

Abstract

The existence of thresholds constitutes an important frontier topic for resilience analysis and measurement. This paper contributes to the literature by identifying critical resilience thresholds below which rural Tanzanian households are unable to absorb the negative effects of temperature anomalies on long-run growth. To make up for the lack of long micro panels, we generate a synthetic panel covering the time span 2000–2013. We show that 25%–47% of households in our sample lie below the estimated thresholds. The evidence of resilience-driven regime shifts and non-linear dynamics has important implications for adaptation to climate change in developing countries and is of significant interest for policy interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • d'Errico, Marco & Letta, Marco & Montalbano, Pierluigi & Pietrelli, Rebecca, 2019. "Resilience Thresholds to Temperature Anomalies: A Long-run Test for Rural Tanzania," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 1-1.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:164:y:2019:i:c:7
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2019.106365
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    Cited by:

    1. Desalegn A. Gugissa & Zewdu Abro & Tadele Tefera, 2022. "Achieving a Climate-Change Resilient Farming System through Push–Pull Technology: Evidence from Maize Farming Systems in Ethiopia," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(5), pages 1-20, February.
    2. Marco d’Errico & Jeanne Pinay & Ellestina Jumbe & Anh Hong Luu, 2023. "Drivers and stressors of resilience to food insecurity: evidence from 35 countries," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 15(5), pages 1161-1183, October.
    3. d’Errico, Marco & Pinay, Jeanne & Luu, Anh & Jumbe, Ellestina, "undated". "Drivers and stressors of resilience to food insecurity – Evidence from 35 countries," ESA Working Papers 319839, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Agricultural Development Economics Division (ESA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Resilience thresholds; Food security; Household growth; Temperature shocks; Climate change;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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