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Is there a wage penalty for occupational feminization? Evidence from Thai labor market

Author

Listed:
  • Lusi Liao

    (University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce)

  • Sasiwimon W Paweenawat

    (University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce)

Abstract

This paper studies how occupational feminization affects wages in the context of a developing country with high female labour force participation. Using the Labour Force Survey of Thailand from 1985 to 2017, we employ a pseudo panel approach considering the unobserved heterogeneity across individuals. The results indicate that the effect of occupational feminization on wages varies by gender and there is a growing wage penalty related to occupational feminization.

Suggested Citation

  • Lusi Liao & Sasiwimon W Paweenawat, 2020. "Is there a wage penalty for occupational feminization? Evidence from Thai labor market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(3), pages 2143-2153.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-19-00979
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Occupational feminization; Gender segregation; Pseudo Panel; Fixed effect; Thailand;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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