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Welfare analysis of bank capital requirements with endogenous default

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  • Fernando Garcia-Barragan
  • Guangling Liu

Abstract

This paper presents a tractable framework with endogenous default and evaluates the welfare implication of bank capital requirements. We analyze the response of social welfare to a negative technology shock under different capital requirement regimes with and without default. We show that including default as an additional indicator of capital requirements is welfare improving. When implementing capital requirements, a more aggressive reaction to the default rate is more effective for weakening the negative effect of the shock on welfare. Compared with output gap, the credit-to-output gap is a better indicator for implementing the countercyclical capital buffer.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando Garcia-Barragan & Guangling Liu, 2017. "Welfare analysis of bank capital requirements with endogenous default," Working Papers 688, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:688
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Alberto Zarazúa Juárez, 2021. "Macroprudential regulation as part of the Mexican policy toolkit," Remef - Revista Mexicana de Economía y Finanzas Nueva Época REMEF (The Mexican Journal of Economics and Finance), Instituto Mexicano de Ejecutivos de Finanzas, IMEF, vol. 16(1), pages 1-27, Enero - M.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bank capital requirement; Default; Welfare; DSGE;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E47 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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