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An Investigation of the Exchange Rate Pass-Through in the Baltic States

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  • Mariarosaria Comunale

    () (Bank of Lithuania & ECB)

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the Exchange Rate Pass-Through (ERPT) to import and consumer prices in the three Baltic states. We apply reduced form equations ?rst. Then, to look at measures of shock-dependent ERPT, we use Bayesian VARs with zero and sign restrictions and a local projection exercise, using common euro area shocks. We ?nd that results from reduced form equations are in line with the ERPT literature. As for shock-dependent ERPTs, the magnitudes are overall bigger than in the literature in the case of import prices. They get smaller for consumer prices and even smaller if we remove energy and food prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariarosaria Comunale, 2019. "An Investigation of the Exchange Rate Pass-Through in the Baltic States," CEIS Research Paper 469, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 17 Sep 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:rtv:ceisrp:469
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    Cited by:

    1. Lian An & Mark A. Wynne & Ren Zhang, 2020. "Shock-Dependent Exchange Rate Pass-Through: Evidence Based on a Narrative Sign Approach," Globalization Institute Working Papers 379, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange Rate Pass-Through; Baltic states; Shock dependence.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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