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Infrastructure finance in Europe: Composition, evolution and crisis impact

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Abstract

This article is the first attempt to compile comprehensive data on infrastructure finance in Europe. We decompose infrastructure finance by institutional sector (i.e. public versus private) into its main components, which consist of traditional public procurement, project finance and finance by the corporate sector, and analyse how the roles of the public and private sectors in financing infrastructure have evolved over time, especially during the recent economic and financial crisis. In contrast with government finance that is slightly up, private finance, in particular project finance through Publi-Private Partnerships, has fallen substantially during the recent crisis, reversing, at least temporarily, the longer-term trend of more private and less public financing of infrastructure.

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  • Wagenvoort, Rien & de Nicola, Carlo & Kappeler, Andreas, 2010. "Infrastructure finance in Europe: Composition, evolution and crisis impact," EIB Papers 1/2010, European Investment Bank, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:eibpap:2010_001
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    Cited by:

    1. Buso, Marco & Marty, Frederic & Tran, Phuong Tra, 2017. "Public-private partnerships from budget constraints: Looking for debt hiding?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 56-84.
    2. Andreas Kappeler, 2015. "Estonia: Raising Productivity and Benefitting more from Openness," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1215, OECD Publishing.
    3. Lorena Viñuela, 2014. "Trends and Quality of Decentralized Public Investment," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1407, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    4. Riccardo Fiorentini & Guido Montani, 2013. "Beyond Austerity A European Recovery Policy Is Feasible," Working Papers 06/2013, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    5. Inderst, Georg, 2017. "UK Infrastructure Investment and Finance from a European and Global Perspective," MPRA Paper 79621, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Daniel Wurstbauer & Wolfgang Schäfers, 2015. "Inflation hedging and protection characteristics of infrastructure and real estate assets," Journal of Property Investment & Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 19-44, February.
    7. David Martimort & Flavio Menezes & Myrna Wooders & LUCIANO GRECO, 2015. "Imperfect Bundling in Public–Private Partnerships," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(1), pages 136-146, February.
    8. Luciano Greco, 2012. "Imperfect Bundling In Public-Private Partnerships," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0147, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    9. Pekka Leviakangas & Pekka Kess & Jaakko Kujala, 2013. "Investment Analysis in Public-Private-Partnership Projects: Any Common Ground for Public and Private Investors?," Diversity, Technology, and Innovation for Operational Competitiveness: Proceedings of the 2013 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, ToKnowPress.
    10. Andrea Sartori, 2013. "I project bond in Italia: problemi e prospettive," CRANEC - Working Papers del Centro di Ricerche in Analisi economica e sviluppo economico internazionale crn1303, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Centro di Ricerche in Analisi economica e sviluppo economico internazionale (CRANEC).
    11. Inderst, Georg, 2013. "Private infrastructure finance and investment in Europe," EIB Working Papers 2013/02, European Investment Bank (EIB).
    12. Inderst, Georg, 2015. "Social infrastructure investment: private finance and institutional investors," MPRA Paper 69504, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Revoltella, Debora & Brutscher, Philipp-Bastian & Tsiotras, Alexandra & Weiss, Christoph, 2016. "Infrastructure investment in Europe and international competitiveness," EIB Working Papers 2016/01, European Investment Bank (EIB).
    14. Oliveira, Matheus & Ribeiro, Joana & Macário, Rosário, 2016. "Are we planning investments to fail? Consequences of traffic forecast effects on PPP contracts: Portuguese and Brazilian cases," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 167-174.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Infrastructure investment; Public-Private Partnerships; Project finance; Crisis impact;

    JEL classification:

    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • L32 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Public Enterprises; Public-Private Enterprises

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