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Channels of Interprovincial Consumption Risk Sharing in the People’s Republic of China

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Listed:
  • Du, Julan

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • He, Qing

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Rui, Oliver M.

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

This paper analyzes consumption risk sharing among provinces in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) during 1980–2007. The analysis finds that 9.4% of shocks to gross provincial product are smoothed by the interprovincial fiscal transfer system. This system also cushions a relatively large percentage of province-specific shocks in coastal areas. Using a variety of indicators, we explored nonfiscal channels of consumption risk sharing. We found that the migration of rural labor to urban areas and the remittance of migrant wages play an important role in promoting interprovincial consumption risk sharing in inland PRC provinces. In contrast, the extent of risk sharing through financial intermediation and capital markets is very limited. These factors have resulted in a low degree of risk sharing among provinces, especially during the last decade.

Suggested Citation

  • Du, Julan & He, Qing & Rui, Oliver M., 2011. "Channels of Interprovincial Consumption Risk Sharing in the People’s Republic of China," ADBI Working Papers 334, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0334
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    File URL: http://www.adbi.org/files/2011.12.21.wp334.channels.interprovincial.consumption.risk.sharing.prc.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Inter-provincial risk sharing in China
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-03-19 19:52:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Jin, Ling & Chen, Kevin Z. & Yu, Bingxin & Filipski, Mateusz, 2015. "Farmers' Coping Strategies against an Aggregate Shock: Evidence from the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211814, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. He, Qing & Xue, Chang & Zhu, Chenqi, 2014. "Financial development and patterns of industrial specialization : Regional evidence from China," BOFIT Discussion Papers 12/2014, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    3. Te Lai, 2015. "Regional Capital Mobility in China: An Endogenous Parameter Approach," Applied Economics and Finance, Redfame publishing, vol. 2(3), pages 63-75, August.
    4. Chakraborty, Tanika & Mirkasimov, Bakhrom & Steiner, Susan, 2015. "Transfer behavior in migrant sending communities," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 690-705.
    5. Cécile BATISSE & Mary-Françoise RENARD & Nasser ARY TANIMOUNE, 2013. "Foreign Direct Investment across China: what should we learn from spatial dependences?," Working Papers 201312, CERDI.
    6. Joseph DeJuan & Tony S. Wirjanto & Xinpeng Xu, 2016. "The Adjustment of Consumption to Income Changes Across Chinese Provinces," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 17(2), pages 235-253, November.
    7. Qing He & Jack W. Hou & Boqun Wang & Ning Zhang, 2014. "Time-varying volatility in the Chinese economy: A regional perspective," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(2), pages 249-268, June.
    8. Ho, Chun-Yu & Ho, Wai-Yip Alex & Li, Dan, 2015. "Intranational risk sharing and its determinants," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 89-113.
    9. Chan, Kenneth S. & Lai, Jennifer T. & Yan, Isabel K.M., 2014. "Consumption risk sharing and self-insurance across provinces in China: 1952–2008," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 66-85.
    10. He, Qing & Chen, Haiqiang, 2014. "Recent macroeconomic stability in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 505-519.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    prc provinces; interprovincial fiscal transfers; consumption risk sharing;

    JEL classification:

    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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