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Green Growth (for China): A Literature Review

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  • Ho, Mun

    () (Resources for the Future)

  • Wang, Zhongmin

    () (Resources for the Future)

Abstract

This paper has two purposes. The first is to review the emerging literature on green growth, with a focus on the origin and meaning of the concept, as well as the justifications for and criticisms of the concept. The general idea of taking into account the impact of economic growth policies on the environment is not very controversial, but the possibility of simultaneously achieving conventional GDP growth and environmental protection is debated. The second purpose is to consider how China might move on to a green growth path. We summarize a sizable literature that traces China’s rapid economic growth and the associated environmental problems to its unique and fundamental institutions, and discuss the implications of this on how China might grow more sustainably.

Suggested Citation

  • Ho, Mun & Wang, Zhongmin, 2014. "Green Growth (for China): A Literature Review," Discussion Papers dp-14-22, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-14-22
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    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/RFF-DP-14-22.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Newell, Richard G. & Sanchirico, James N. & Kerr, Suzi, 2005. "Fishing quota markets," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 437-462, May.
    3. Hallegatte, Stephane & Heal, Geoffrey & Fay, Marianne & Treguer, David, 2011. "From growth to green growth -- a framework," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5872, The World Bank.
    4. Lin, Boqiang & Jiang, Zhujun, 2011. "Estimates of energy subsidies in China and impact of energy subsidy reform," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 273-283, March.
    5. Michael Jacobs, 2012. "Green Growth: Economic Theory and Political Discourse," GRI Working Papers 92, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    6. Gene M. Grossman & Alan B. Krueger, 1995. "Economic Growth and the Environment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(2), pages 353-377.
    7. Chenggang Xu, 2011. "The Fundamental Institutions of China's Reforms and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1076-1151, December.
    8. Robert N. Stavins, 2011. "The Problem of the Commons: Still Unsettled after 100 Years," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 81-108, February.
    9. Aunan, Kristin & Berntsen, Terje & O'Connor, David & Persson, Therese Hindman & Vennemo, Haakon & Zhai, Fan, 2007. "Benefits and costs to China of a climate policy," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(3), pages 471-497, June.
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    11. Siqi Zheng & Matthew E. Kahn, 2013. "Understanding China's Urban Pollution Dynamics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(3), pages 731-772, September.
    12. Arik Levinson, 2001. "The Ups and Downs of the Environmental Kuznets Curve," Working Papers gueconwpa~01-01-08, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
    13. Danielle Resnick & Finn Tarp & James Thurlow, 2012. "The Political Economy Of Green Growth: Cases From Southern Africa," Public Administration & Development, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 215-228, August.
    14. Schmalensee, Richard, 2012. "From “Green Growth” to sound policies: An overview," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S1), pages 2-6.
    15. Haakon Vennemo & Kristin Aunan & Henrik Lindhjem & Hans Martin Seip, 2009. "Environmental Pollution in China: Status and Trends," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 3(2), pages 209-230, Summer.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sugandha Srivastav & Sam Fankhauser & Alex Kazaglis, 2018. "Low-Carbon Competitiveness in Asia," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-18, January.

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    Keywords

    green growth; economic development; environmental protection; China;

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