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Green Growth (for China): A Literature Review

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  • Ho, Mun

    (Resources for the Future)

  • Wang, Zhongmin

    (Resources for the Future)

Abstract

This paper has two purposes. The first is to review the emerging literature on green growth, with a focus on the origin and meaning of the concept, as well as the justifications for and criticisms of the concept. The general idea of taking into account the impact of economic growth policies on the environment is not very controversial, but the possibility of simultaneously achieving conventional GDP growth and environmental protection is debated. The second purpose is to consider how China might move on to a green growth path. We summarize a sizable literature that traces China’s rapid economic growth and the associated environmental problems to its unique and fundamental institutions, and discuss the implications of this on how China might grow more sustainably.

Suggested Citation

  • Ho, Mun & Wang, Zhongmin, 2014. "Green Growth (for China): A Literature Review," Discussion Papers dp-14-22, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-14-22
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    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/RFF-DP-14-22.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Sugandha Srivastav & Sam Fankhauser & Alex Kazaglis, 2018. "Low-Carbon Competitiveness in Asia," Economies, MDPI, vol. 6(1), pages 1-18, January.

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    Keywords

    green growth; economic development; environmental protection; China;
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